Chuck E. Cheese

Chuck E. Cheese

To a parent with a headache, it was a preview of purgatory. To the millions of rambunctious kids that have come through its doors over the years, Chuck E. Cheese was instead the nearest thing to heaven. Fluffy animals, yummy pizza, an assortment of arcade games – all the essentials needed for an afternoon of glorious fun were within arm’s reach. In other words, it was a place where a kid could be a kid.

The year was 1977, and the man who gave us Atari and Pong, Nolan Bushnell, realized that there weren’t enough family-oriented establishments with video games. To fill the void, he came up with an idea for a restaurant where kids and adults could eat and play together. Originally called Chuck E. Cheese’s Pizza Time Theater and located in San Jose, California, it was a small-time operation – a glorified pizza shop with animatronic characters on stage performing for the guests.

As the popularity of video games surged into the 80s, however, this provided the fuel for franchising interest, allowing the company to expand at a rapid pace. At first, most of the restaurants were located along the west coast, but it wasn’t long before other states joined in the fun, eager for the lucrative opportunity to welcome hordes of kids and their profitable birthday parties.

And honestly, what kid wouldn’t want to spend their birthday at Chuck E. Cheese? Such an event made a child an instant hero among his grateful peers. But it wasn’t just kids. Parents were more than happy to sidestep the prospect of a bunch of screaming tykes tearing up their own homes and leaving a horrific mess in the wake. Let the kiddos work off their inexhaustible sugar-induced energy on someone else’s furniture, someone also willing to mop the soda off the floors. In the parent’s eyes, this enticing convenience made a birthday party at Chuck E. Cheese worthy of almost any price.

Besides, It was a great environment for the younger set to share a birthday party, with just about everything on hand that a kid could want: entertainment, pizza, sodas and video games, to start. Many of the games spit out paper tickets based on one’s gaming skills, which could later be redeemed for a nice cheap trinket to remember your day. And, let’s not forget the colorful cast of robotic characters onstage and ready to entertain, a feature that truly set Chuck E. Cheese apart from the competition. Appearing alongside Chucky were such classic characters as Crusty the Cat, Jasper T. Jowls and Pasqually, along with the backup band, The Warblettes. In later years, the restaurant introduced Helen Henny and Mr. Munch – new friends for a new generation of Chuck E. Cheese fans.

As if that wasn’t enough fun, the big cheese himself, Chucky, would personally greet each celebrant and sing him or her a rousing version of Happy Birthday. Talk about the perfect end to an unforgettable day. And when the festivities wore down, a bunch of sleepy and physically exhausted kids, with vocal cords so hoarse that they barely worked, was the perfect end to the parents day as well.

Chuck E. Cheese is still going strong for three decades and counting, with over 500 restaurants dotting the American landscape. In recent years, some changes have occurred, healthier options have been added to the menus, and some locations even offer beer and wine to help soothe those parental nerves. But what hasn’t changed is their continued efforts to stay true to a philosophy that has served the company well over time – a simple place where a kid can be a kid.

Were you one of the lucky kids that got to celebrate a birthday (either yours or someone else’s) at Chuck E. Cheese? We would love to hear all of your childhood memories in our comments section below.

Revision List

#1 on 2014-Jul-25 Fri  07:15+-25200

#2 on 2014-Jun-03 Tue  06:06+-25200

#3 on 2014-Jun-03 Tue  06:52+-25200

#4 on 2014-Jun-03 Tue  06:38+-25200

One Response to “Chuck E. Cheese”

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  1. Name says:

    What about showbiz pizza place?

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