HR-Pufnstuf

H.R. Pufnstuf

The psychedelic atmosphere of those lovable 60s flowed well into the next decade, especially in the realm of children’s programming, thanks to the wonderful talents and vision of Sid and Marty Krofft. But of all their creations, which included such live-action offerings as Lidsville, The Bugaloos and Sigmund and the Sea Monsters, perhaps no series was quite as trippy, quite as colorful, and quite as well remembered as H.R. Pufnstuf. Continue reading...

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Marathon Bar

Back in the 70s, there was a true giant in the confectionery world. Sporting a bright red wrapper and containing a full 8” of chocolate and caramel goodness, the Marathon Bar couldn’t help but catch your eye in the candy aisle. And if you were a kid trying to get the most from your measly allowance, this was a surefire way to get some bang from your candy buck. Let’s take a look back. Continue reading...

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Etch-A-Sketch

Perhaps one of the most popular drawing toys ever conceived, the Etch-A-Sketch has been testing the imagination and dexterity of millions of artists for the past fifty years with its two little white knobs. Master their operation and you can create a masterpiece. Make a little mistake, and you will literally have to shake it off and start over. Let's take a look back at the history of this classic toy. Continue reading...

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The Twilight Zone

Television took a turn towards the surreal in 1959, with the debut of a new anthology series called The Twilight Zone. Each 30-minute episode might delve into the areas of science fiction, drama, comedy, horror, or political commentary, but the only thing one could truly expect from each episode was the unexpected. Famous for its last minute twists, the success of the show is attributed to the genius of its creator, writer and host, Rod Serling, who imagined some of the most engaging stories to ever hit the airwaves. Today, just about everyone can cite a favorite episode of this classic series, over 50 years after its debut. Continue reading...

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The Breakfast Club

"How come Andrew gets to get up? If he gets up, we'll all get up, it'll be anarchy!"And as soon as hooligan John Bender took that screw out of the library door in 1985's The Breakfast Club, that's exactly what erupted. It was anarchy because members of five different high school social cliques got together, and even better than that, they actually got along. It was anarchy because by the end of the movie, the five high-schoolers were volumes more enlightened and mature than when they were dropped off just a few hours earlier. If Saturday detentions really taught so much about life, love, growing up and the regrettable fact that they just don't make overhead roof ducts as sturdy as they used to…well then, lock us all up. Continue reading...

Bio-Rhythm Machine

Biorhythm Machines

When the 70s arrived, the old fortune-telling machines of yesteryear seemed a little quaint and outdated. Realizing that Zoltan wasn’t earning a fair share of quarters any more, it was time to pull out the big guns and display the amazing technological leaps that had occurred in the fortune prediction industry. It was time to unveil the Biorhythm machine. Continue reading...

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Whee-Lo

Sometimes the very repetitive nature of games is what makes them so mesmerizing. Such is the case with Whee-Lo, a toy that was introduced in the 1950’s, and was so unique and addictive that it continues to sit on store shelves today. Let's take a look back at this memorable toy that has perpetually entertained us for over half a decade. Continue reading...

In The News

In The News

If you grew up watching television on Saturday mornings in the 70s and early 80s, you probably recall the networks doing their best to sneak in a little educational material between the weekly doses of Super Friends and Scooby Doo. Over on ABC, they chose to teach us about grammar and government, thanks to the ever-popular Schoolhouse Rock. But if you happened to tune into CBS, news anchorman Christopher Glen taught you about current events via In The News. Running from 1971 until 1986, In the News enjoyed a respectable fifteen-year run and made us all a little smarter along the way. Continue reading...