Pulsar

Pulsar

Introduced by Mattel in 1977, Pulsar was a fourteen-inch plastic action figure in the vein of the Six Million Dollar Man and Visible Man. And when we say “vein”, we mean it. Let's take a look back at this self-described "ultimate man of adventure," shall we? Continue reading...

Ditto Paper

Dittos

Kids today don’t even know what they’re missing with their fancy copy machines and computers. Students of a bygone era can recall the bluish-purple print and unforgettable aroma of a freshly printed page of ditto paper. Once part of the daily scholastic routine, technology would eventually lead to the extinction of these fondly remembered machines and the paper they produced. Continue reading...

Kid Power

Kid Power

In 1965, cartoonist Morrie Turner introduced his popular newspaper comic strip, Wee Pals, which focused on a collection of multicultural kids called “The Rainbow Club.” And, although a portion of society was a wee bit uncomfortable with the socially conscious subject matter at the time, it was hard to deny that the cartoon was, above all, funny – funny enough, in fact, to lead ABC to base a Saturday morning animated series on the comic strip called Kid Power. Continue reading...

Pat Benatar

Pat Benatar

The 70s were dominated by hard rocking boys and their guitars so it was always nice to find a gal holding her own in the male-dominated music industry. Pat Benatar was not only a lone female in a sea of testosterone, but she also had one of the best voices to ever grace the charts. Continue reading...

MacAndMeFinal

Mac and Me

If there is one thing that the lovable little extraterrestrial, E.T. taught the film industry, it is that a cute alien and product placement are a match made in heaven. With each handful of Reese’s Pieces that E.T. scarfed down, sales of the candy morsels soared. Now, if an alien from another world liked Reese’s, imagine how much they might like Coca-Cola and McDonalds. And so, the two junk food behemoths joined forces - resulting in the 1988 film, Mac and Me. Continue reading...

Trapper Keeper

Trapper Keeper

One of the keys to scholastic success is to stay organized. And, thanks to the folks at Mead, students from the 70s and 80s could count on a nifty little helper to keep all those notes and assignments in their proper place. Introduced in the late 70s, the Trapper Keeper quickly became the organizer of choice for millions of students, who still fondly remember filing away their school work into the confines of this handy device. Continue reading...

Highway to Heaven

Highway to Heaven

It is understood that grown men don’t cry – unless they happen to be subjected to a show produced by Michael Landon, television’s rainmaker when it comes to turning on the eye faucets. Given a few moments of viewing time, the man could make a statue sob. After years of coaxing viewers to cry with the hit series Little House on the Prairie, he was up to his tear-inducing ways again in his next endeavor, Highway to Heaven. Continue reading...

Lawn Darts

Lawn Darts

Every once in a while, a toy is released with all of the good intentions of the world, and yet, no matter how popular it may become, an unforeseen safety issue arises which requires that it be removed from store shelves. Few, however, have the dubious distinction of being outlawed completely, which brings us to Lawn Darts - those popular ground-piercing projectiles that sent more than a few tykes to the emergency room back in the day. Let’s take a look. Continue reading...