Passing Notes

Passing Notes

Back in the day, long before there was text messaging, you had to – gasp! – actually write out notes and pass them to each other. No delete button. If you wrote it, it was out there for everyone to see: the person the note was intended for, all of his/her friends, and if you were particularly unlucky - the teacher. Let's take a look back at this childhood tradition. Continue reading...

Digger the Dog toy

Digger the Dog

Try to talk the parental units into a canine companion and you’re libel to find yourself battered with lectures on responsibility. And God forbid someone in the household should be harboring a dander allergy. Your hopes of bonding with man’s best friend come to a grinding halt before you even have a chance to pet the little guy. That is, until along came Digger in 1974, that lovable plastic canine that would never become infested with fleas, wouldn’t think of chasing the neighborhood cat, and required no food or water. Continue reading...

Sesame Street

Sesame Street

Since 1969, just about every kid with access to a television can tell you "how to get, how to get to Sesame Street." Filled with all sorts of interesting people and lovable critters, this urban city block has been entertaining kids for decades while sneakily introducing them to all those letters and numbers long before they ever set foot on a school bus. Let's take a look back at the iconic educational program that still resonates in the hearts of anyone who ever watched. Continue reading...

Big Jim

Big Jim

As the Vietnam War raged on in the early 70's, the public had tired of their usual fondness for war-related toys. Heck, even G.I. Joe took on more of a Steve Irwin persona, choosing a life of rugged adventure over another tour of duty. But he was no match in the brawn department to the one and only Big Jim. This was a man's man - a sports hero, martial arts master and adventurer, all wrapped up in one beefy package. Continue reading...

The Flintstones

The Flintstones

Who could forget The Flintstones, the modern stone-age family that first rocked prime time television on September 30, 1960, courtesy of Hanna-Barbera Productions. From their inception through the next 6 seasons, the cartoon endeared itself to millions of viewers with the prehistoric antics of Fred and Wilma Flintstone and their sidekick neighbors, Barney and Betty Rubble. Continue reading...

Mattel Lie Detector game

Lie Detector

For future gumshoes of the world, who needed a challenge greater than the iconic Clue game could provide, came the much more challenging detective game of the 60s – Lie Detector. Not only were up-and-coming sleuths faced with a staggering 24 suspects, rather than the six regulars that inhabited the competing game, but a real-life Official Mattel Lie Detector was included to put the screws on the suspected perpetrator. Continue reading...

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Double Dare

Nickelodeon brought green slime to the forefront of television with its 1986 program, Double Dare. A combination of quiz show and obstacle course, the kid’s network made sure to provide plenty of slime, jelly, syrup, and other forms of goo. Host Marc Summers started things off by having the two competing teams, decked out in safety helmets, start with a “physical challenge.” This consisted of pushing apples with their noses in a wheelbarrow race, throwing eggs to their partners who cracked them on their heads, or wrapping their partners in toilet paper. Whoever could finish the stunt first controlled the game. Once the first mess had been made, Summers introduced the teams with names like “Ghastly Goobers” and “Stud Muffins.” […] Continue reading...

Mr. Zip

Mr Zip

He was a tireless public servant, facing indifference and ignorance at every turn. And yet, with the monumental task he was given, he performed like a true hero and made sure that all correspondence was handled in the most efficient manner. He was Mr. Zip, “Zippy” to his friends, and he made the world a better place, five little numbers at a time. Continue reading...