The Smurfs

The Smurfs

Forget the British Invasion of the 60s; let’s talk about the lesser-known Flemish Invasion of the early 80s. For that is when America was introduced to a herd of little blue humanoids known as Schtroumphs in their native land. Not ringing a bell yet? Perhaps you know them by their American translation – Smurfs. Created back in 1957 by cartoonist Peyo Culliford, they first made their presence known in the form of toys, but once TV executive Fred Silverman wisely bought the rights to use their likeness on NBC, The Smurfs quickly won over the hearts of tykes from coast to coast and Smurfmania was on the rise. Continue reading...

Frogger

Frogger

For those who didn't necessarily want to wage their arcade battles in the far reaches of space, there was once a game called Frogger, which allowed us to help a member of the animal kingdom traverse obstacles both natural and man-made, and find his way safely to his preferred habitat. This journey, both daunting and surprisingly addictive, made Konami's Frogger an instant hit among the masses, and one of the most beloved video games to emerge from the 80s. Continue reading...

The Goonies

The Goonies

If you were a kid back in the mid-80s, you likely know The Goonies like the back of your hand, maybe even able to quote it with ease. That's because this adventurous 1985 film charmed the hearts of millions of kids back in the day - enough so that it that it still maintains a cult following. Let's take a look back. Continue reading...

Slip-n-Slide

Slip ‘N Slide

Peering jealously over the fence at the neighbor’s nice big pool became a thing of the past with the Slip ‘n Slide. When the summer weather was scorching hot and the beach was an inconvenient distance away, kids found cool relief along a runway made of plastic. Hooked up to the garden hose, the runway magically transformed into the wettest, most slippery surface ever devised by man. Continue reading...

Famous Amos

Famous Amos

In the world of snack foods, there is perhaps no better representation of the “American Dream” than the inspiring story of a humble man named Wally Amos. He grew up in Tallahassee, Florida and learned from his aunt how to make her celebrated chocolate chip cookies. And while it took him many years, Wally “Famous” Amos learned that if you do what you love, the rewards can be amazing. His Famous Amos cookies surged in popularity throughout the 80s and are now found just about anywhere that cookies are sold. Continue reading...

The Wonder Years

The Wonder Years

In 1988, a television show debuted that quickly won the heart of every baby boomer out there. The Wonder Years followed the daily life of a young boy named Kevin Arnold, who was coming of age during the turbulence of the late 60s. While Kevin struggled with his own adolescence, the nation had it's own challenges - the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, and the liberation of women - and millions tuned in each week to follow the trials and tribulations of this all-American suburban family. Continue reading...

Monopoly

Monopoly

Let’s face it - most of us are never going to be filthy rich. Most of us are never going to wheel and deal and build a gigantic real estate empire filled with hotels, railroads and entire city blocks. And yet, just about every person in the civilized world has an inkling into what it might feel like for there are few among us who have never spent a few hours feeling like a big shot. Continue reading...

Centipede

Centipede

The male-dominated video game industry was injected with a woman’s perspective in 1980, when Dona Bailey became the first woman to help design an arcade game. Alongside the legendary Atari programmer Ed Logg, who had unleashed Asteroids on the public a year earlier, the pair created a masterpiece called Centipede, one of the first games to appeal to both men and women alike. The result was one of the most successful titles in arcade history. Continue reading...