Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

Unlike Trix cereal, cartoons aren't always for kids. The Flintstones, created by Hanna-Barbera, blazed the prime-time animation trail in the 60s, proving that a cartoon series could hold its own against some live-action competition. In the 70s, Hanna-Barbera tried again with Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, a show about a typical family with a few issues. And, much like The Flintstones borrowed from The Honeymooners, the new show was inspired by the much more controversial sitcom, All in the Family. Continue reading...

Memory

Memory

Every once in a while, a game manages to teach a few valuable skills to unsuspecting players and make them smarter without them ever realizing it. Candyland snuck in some color recognition mentoring. Hi Ho! Cherry-O stealthily gave kids the ability to count, and Hot Potato … well, that taught the valuable lesson that if you holding something that is hot, you should hand it to someone else immediately. But in terms of developing concentration and matching skills, the name of the game was Memory – a simple card game that taxed those brain cells to no end. Continue reading...

Body on Tap

Body on Tap

An icy bottle of beer has long been considered the perfect remedy to a hard day’s work, but its miraculous powers go far beyond its ability to relax and refresh. It’s also long been recognized as a great way to bring some life back to a dull and listless head of hair. But since most people would rather drink their beer than pour it on their head, Bristol Myers decided to introduce some suds into their hair care products in 1978 and the result was Body on Tap shampoo. Continue reading...

Rocky

Rocky

The rags-to-riches story of a nobody trying to make the best of his one shot began in the mind of an unknown actor named Sylvester Stallone. Stallone witnessed a boxing match between the legendary Muhammed Ali and virtual unknown Chuck Wepner and the spark was born. After mulling it over in his mind for about a month, Stallone sat down and punched out a first draft in only three days. Little did he know just how far that script would take him in his career, as Rocky and its multiple sequels would enthrall movie audiences for years to come. Continue reading...

Connect Four

Connect Four

Commercials come and go, but catch phrases live forever. The final quarter of the twentieth century heard just such a phrase moaned from the lips of one young boy after having lost a game to his sister. While no boy in his right mind wants to lose to a younger sibling, losing at Connect Four ranks with Sorry! and Risk in the pantheon of crushing defeats. Perhaps that’s why before Milton Bradley marketed the game in 1974 under the goal-oriented name “Connect Four,” it was simply and somewhat quietly known as The Captain’s Mistress. Continue reading...

M*A*S*H

M*A*S*H

For eleven seasons, television viewers found themselves in the midst of the Korean War - a conflict that only lasted three years in real life. During that run, M*A*S*H captured the hearts of millions of viewers, providing guttural laughter one moment, and tears of sorrow the next, often within the same half-hour. It is one of the highest-acclaimed series to ever grace the television screen. Continue reading...

Charms Blow Pops

Charms Blow Pops

In the 1970s, we all heard about the famous confectionary pairing of chocolate and peanut butter, otherwise known as the Reese's Peanut Butter Cup, but another innovative marriage of sweet ingredients was unleashed on the populace in 1973, one equally worthy of mention, when the Charms Candy Company introduced the world's first bubble gum filled lollipop - the Charms Blow Pop. The candy world would never be the same. Continue reading...

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

A.A. Milne's beloved characters came to animated life in Disney's The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. Released in 1977, the film was actually a compilation of three separate stories - Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree, Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day and Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too - each of which had been shown previously as a theatrical short (Blustery Day won a posthumous Oscar for Walt Disney in 1969). The packaged format gave Pooh, Piglet, Kanga, Roo, Eeyore and the others a broader audience on which to work their easygoing charms. Continue reading...