Connect Four

Connect Four

Commercials come and go, but catch phrases live forever. The final quarter of the twentieth century heard just such a phrase moaned from the lips of one young boy after having lost a game to his sister. While no boy in his right mind wants to lose to a younger sibling, losing at Connect Four ranks with Sorry! and Risk in the pantheon of crushing defeats. Perhaps that’s why before Milton Bradley marketed the game in 1974 under the goal-oriented name “Connect Four,” it was simply and somewhat quietly known as The Captain’s Mistress. Continue reading...

M*A*S*H

M*A*S*H

For eleven seasons, television viewers found themselves in the midst of the Korean War - a conflict that only lasted three years in real life. During that run, M*A*S*H captured the hearts of millions of viewers, providing guttural laughter one moment, and tears of sorrow the next, often within the same half-hour. It is one of the highest-acclaimed series to ever grace the television screen. Continue reading...

Charms Blow Pops

Charms Blow Pops

In the 1970s, we all heard about the famous confectionary pairing of chocolate and peanut butter, otherwise known as the Reese's Peanut Butter Cup, but another innovative marriage of sweet ingredients was unleashed on the populace in 1973, one equally worthy of mention, when the Charms Candy Company introduced the world's first bubble gum filled lollipop - the Charms Blow Pop. The candy world would never be the same. Continue reading...

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

A.A. Milne's beloved characters came to animated life in Disney's The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. Released in 1977, the film was actually a compilation of three separate stories - Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree, Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day and Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too - each of which had been shown previously as a theatrical short (Blustery Day won a posthumous Oscar for Walt Disney in 1969). The packaged format gave Pooh, Piglet, Kanga, Roo, Eeyore and the others a broader audience on which to work their easygoing charms. Continue reading...

Sorry!

Sorry!

The ancient game of strategy called Parcheesi got a modern makeover in the early 20th century, emerging as Sorry! the game that apologized for your woeful lack of skill and/or good fortune. First seen in England, it was imported to America in 1934 by Parker Brothers and a new family institution was born. Hearing your mom saying "Sorry!" in a saccharine, condescending voice as she denied you victory was enough to make you wonder if the notion of motherly love wasn't just a big crock. Continue reading...

B-52s

The B-52’s

There are plenty of party bands, but no other band can party quite like the B-52's. These leaders of the new wave movement took joy in being different, blazing their own trail with a unique combination of kitsch-culture and old-fashioned party music. In the process, they notched up a series of hit albums and influenced countless alternative-rock acts of the future. Continue reading...

Levi's

Levi’s

They are as much a part of American culture as Coca-Cola, probably the most iconic clothing item ever created. And just about every American in the last hundred years has, at one time or another, zipped or buttoned up a pair of the comfortable and highly durable jeans that have come to be known simply as “Levi's.” Continue reading...

The Partridge Family

The Partridge Family

Hello, world! Watch out for that wacky bus, it's got a singing family inside! The Partridge Family phenomenon blanketed the early 70s with many a groovy beat and one shining teen heartthrob, as this musical television series told the tale of a widowed mother and her five children who hit the road as a pop band. Continue reading...