Aqua Net

Aqua Net

A big helmet of hair, impervious to the elements, was an important element of both 60s and 80s fashion, the latter thanks to the influence and abundance of heavy metal hair bands and mohawked punkers. And to get their locks of hair to defy the laws of gravity, these folks and their fans overwhelmingly turned to a tried and true product called Aqua Net, the aerosol-based hairspray with ultra hold. Continue reading...

Aqua Velva

Aqua Velva

The teenage years are a troublesome time. All a boy wants to do is be found attractive by someone, and success is unlikely if one isn’t smelling their best. But hope could be found in a soothing blue liquid - as males in generations past took a cue from dear old dad and liberally splashed on the unforgettable scent of Aqua Velva. Continue reading...

Ark II

Ark II

When the Saturday morning series Ark II debuted in 1976, it bore little resemblance to its biblical counterpart. Sure, there was a post-apocalyptic world and a small group of survivors determined to repopulate the earth. They had an Ark of sorts, more of a high-tech Land Rover on steroids. Missing were the countless pairs of animals - although to their credit, they did have a monkey. Continue reading...

Arkanoid

Arkanoid

After revolutionizing the world with a video game called Pong, Atari followed up with a similar hit called Breakout. The paddle and ball were still there, which the player now used to knock down a wall of bricks. Imitators followed in droves but one game stands out as a worthy competitor – Taito’s Arkanoid, released a decade later and full of interesting variations. Continue reading...

Asteroids

Asteroids

Of all the arcade games released over the years, a mere handful have reached iconic status, games that if you lived in a particular generation, there was little chance that you had escaped their magnetism. The Atari mega-hit Asteroids is certainly deserving of this special status. Released in 1979, during the era of Star Wars, it utilized simple black and white vector graphics, an (at the time) impressive array of buttons, and a repeatability factor that was unparalleled. Continue reading...

Astro Pop

Astro Pop

The Space Age was in full swing after World War II. Swift technological progress and widespread economic growth gave birth to a culture in love with rockets, space stations, and dreams of life on the moon. Every kid wanted to be an astronaut, and every week, a new toy or TV show was there to feed that dream.Spangler Candy of Bryan, Ohio, (founded in 1906) met this demand with the snazzy, rocket-shaped Astro Pop. This lollipop, a thin inverted cone of hard candy on stick, suggested a three-stage rocket: a red cherry-flavored lower section, a dark green lime middle, and a long yellow tip of lemon. Continue reading...

Astronaut Food

Astronaut Food

Throughout most of the 20th century, it was no secret that space travel captured the imaginations of just about every tyke in existence. As the 60s arrived and astronauts started venturing out into this vast unknown, one particular area of interest was the food that the space travelers took with them. Realizing some serious marketing potential here, numerous manufacturers decided to give young consumers a taste of what these brave explorers were munching in their zero gravity environment. Continue reading...

Atari

Atari

The granddaddy of all platform and handheld game stations, the Atari Video Computer System remains a classic. In the tradition of trench warfare and bayonets, Atari maintains its appeal despite its antiquity. And, like Kleenex or Xerox, the word itself became synonymous with the activity it represented. In the late 70s and early 80s, nobody played video games at home; they played Atari. One had to go to the arcade or to the corner of the local sandwich shop to play video games. Atari, on the other hand, offered a comparable selection of games, required no quarters, and could be played at all hours from the comforts of your living room. Continue reading...