Silly String

Silly String

Like some of your finer spray cheeses, Silly String comes packaged in an aerosol container and can be shot at targets up to 10 feet away. Sadly, it’s not edible like its Kraft counterpart, but ever since Wham-O introduced this novelty in the late 60s, it's probably appeared at just as many parties. Continue reading...

Good Humor Ice Cream

Good Humor

In the scorching heat of a summer’s day, few sounds beckon to a child like the playful jingle of an ice cream truck in the distance - gradually moving closer, block by block, until it finally turns the corner and heads slowly down their street. At the first notice of the approaching melody, kids scatter in all directions, making a mad dash towards the parents, begging for enough change to purchase a frozen delicacy. And for over eighty years, little white Good Humor trucks have done their part to ensure that ice cream is available to all, offering varieties of the very thing that made them famous almost a century ago - ice cream on a stick. Continue reading...

Jaws

Jaws

The era of the modern summer blockbuster came riding in on the fins of a great white shark. Jaws was not only the most successful film of 1975, it was the most successful film the world had yet seen. With an unforgettable cast, a delightfully ominous musical score, and two hours of white-knuckled suspense, Jaws did for the beach what Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho had done for showers 15 years earlier. Continue reading...

HI-C

Hi-C

We can trace many of our beloved comfort foods back to the post-war 50s, an era which introduced such future staples as Jello Instant Pudding and Rice-a-Roni. The innovative decade also brought a new fruity beverage in a big tin can called Hi-C. A perfect thirst-quencher on a hot summer's day, and (slightly) healthier than soda pop, kids loved it from the beginning and continue to gulp down glasses of the sweet concoction some sixty years later. Continue reading...

Hoppity Hop

Hoppity Hop

Something about being a little kid brings out an irrepressible need to jump and bounce. Who among us didn't mercilessly assault our bedroom mattresses as if they were a circus trampoline? And, if you wanted to go bouncing down the block to a friend's house, and if you weren't quite coordinated enough to handle a pogo stick, there was only one real choice - the Hoppity Hop (or Hippity Hop, if you prefer). In their heyday, these popular playthings filled suburban streets with their distinctive sounds, as happy children everywhere got their bouncing fix. Continue reading...

Race For Your Life, Charlie Brown

Race For Your Life, Charlie Brown

The iconic group of characters from Charles M. Shulz’s beloved comic strip Peanuts were certainly no strangers to the big screen. In 1969, they reckoned with a National Spelling Bee in A Boy Called Charlie Brown and in 1972, searched far and wide for everyone’s favorite pooch in Snoopy, Come Home. It was time for a new adventure in 1977, as the gang tackled the perils of summer camp in the feature film, Race For Your Life, Charlie Brown. Continue reading...

Funny Face

Funny Face

Nothing says summer like a cold pitcher of powdered drink mix, ready to stave off dehydration and quench the thirst after a day of playing in the hot sun. At mere pennies a serving, these colorful and fruity concoctions have been a favorite of parents and kids alike for decades. Of course, we all know who the leader of the pack is, with their familiar mascot ready to burst through a wall at the first mention of his name, but even a star as recognizable as the Kool-Aid Man had to contend with a worthy competitor in the 60s and 70s, a fondly-remembered drink mix called Funny Face. Continue reading...

Meatballs

Meatballs

Bill Murray found success as one of the iconic “Not Ready For Prime Time Players” on Saturday Night Live in the 70s. And like his cohorts, Chevy Chase and John Belushi, his next career step was films. His first starring role was as out-of-control camp counselor Tripper Harrison in the comedy Meatballs. Released in 1979 and directed by Ivan Reitman, (who had just finished producing Animal House) Meatballs wasn’t exactly a children's film. It was a bit too risqué for that, garnering a PG rating - but it was still managed to be seen by a heck of a lot of kids who still fondly remember the summer-themed film to this day. Continue reading...