SpaghettiOs

SpaghettiOs

Isn't it funny how food can serve so aptly as a time machine? The mere mention of some items can miraculously transport us right back to the kitchen table of our youth. Such is the power of SpaghettiOs, those tiny rings of pasta packed in a strangely-sweet orange sauce. Of course, it also doesn't hurt that they have left an indelible mark on our memory with that brain-adhesive catch phrase/jingle "Uh, oh, SpaghettiOs!" Perhaps that's why, even in adulthood, when we know we should never eat such things, some of us are still compelled to grab a can of the stuff on occasion and toss it into the shopping cart when nobody is looking. Powerful stuff. Continue reading...

See-N-Say

See ‘n Say

The premise is simple: pull the string and the toy talks to you. But a Mattel See 'n Say was so much more. It was an engaging and effective teaching tool, one that captivated every toddler from the 60s and beyond who ever tugged on that durable cord and heard a cow say moo. Continue reading...

Reggie!

Reggie!

In 1921, the Curtiss Candy Company introduced a candy bar called the Baby Ruth, yet insisted that it had no connection to the reigning Sultan of Swat, Babe Ruth, who was the biggest sports hero in the nation at the time (lest they have to pay royalties). Instead, the company maintained that they named their product after President Grover Cleveland's young daughter Ruth. While the debate still continues in some circles, there was no similar ambiguity when another baseball legend, Yankee slugger Reggie Jackson, was honored with his own candy bar in 1978. Simply named Reggie!, and featuring a large likeness of the hitter on its bright orange wrapper, there was no doubt that Jackson officially sanctioned this candy treat. Continue reading...

Give-A-Show Projector

Give-A-Show Projector

Grab some popcorn and dim the lights – it’s show time! And best of all, no movie theater required. Thanks to the Kenner Give-A-Show Projector, you could be the envy of your friends and the proprietor of your very own movie theater.Well, sort of... Continue reading...

The Little Rascals

The Little Rascals

Between 1922 and 1948, comedic film director Hal Roach created a total of 220 film shorts under the name Our Gang. Featuring over 41 different child actors over the years, the beloved shorts chronicled the adventures of a group of children who lived in a poverty-stricken neighborhood together. In the early 50s, thanks to the enormous popularity of the series, MGM took 80 of the shorts and packaged them for television as The Little Rascals. And, in the decades that followed, millions of former kids sat mesmerized by the hilarious antics and colorful characters. A staple of syndicated television for many years, they still hold a fond place in our hearts. Continue reading...

Kool-Aid

Kool-Aid

Few soft drinks share the pop culture significance of an ice-cold pitcher of Kool-Aid. A staple of summertime for literally generations of tykes, it is also a favorite among parents for it costs mere pennies per serving and is so easy to make - any youngster can whip up a batch on their own in just a few minutes - providing a perfect refreshment after a hard day's play. Continue reading...

Silly Putty

Silly Putty

What an inert, innocent appearance for such a versatile toy. Silly Putty would just sit there like a lump—literally—until you deigned to pick it up. But then, oh then…it came alive. Well, not really; there was a fair amount of elbow grease involved in getting enjoyment out of the Putty. It bounced; it flowed (if given enough time); it stuck to the wall; it stuck to newsprint and comic books and copied whatever was on the page; it even picked up pet hair and dust, should the average 8-year old feel a sudden urge to clean the living room. It could be kneaded and bent, stretched and flattened. And it owed its existence to an accident. Continue reading...

The Archies

The Archies

One of the most noteworthy garage bands of the 1960s, The Archies showcased the fun side of adolescence with their sunny attitude and catchy pop tunes. They never performed live because, unfortunately, every band member suffered from acute cartoonitis, a condition that renders the afflicted brightly colored and two-dimensional. Archie, Jughead and the rest of the gang peddled their cotton candy sounds on The Archie Show, a Saturday morning cartoon which debuted in 1968. Continue reading...