Toss-Across

Toss Across

Requiring only a pencil and paper, the game of tic-tac-toe can be played practically anywhere, and has served as a remedy for boredom to many a young child over the years, at least until they get old enough to realize that a match between two skilled players is apt to lead to a draw, and draws just aren't fun. In 1969, the creative minds at Ideal Toys found a way to turn tic-tac-toe into a carnival game of sorts, where luck and finesse were just as important as strategy. The game was called Toss Across and it soon found its way into millions of homes, becoming a beloved toy to a generation of 70s kids and beyond. Continue reading...

Toucan Sam

Toucan Sam

It is a well-known fact that in the world of cartoons, a big nose allows one to smell things at great distances. Perhaps the best example of this ability lies in a colorful creature from the South American rainforests, Ramphastos sulfuratus, or in layman’s terms, a keel-billed Toucan by the name of Sam – Toucan Sam. Continue reading...

Toughskin Jeans

Toughskin Jeans

Kids have the remarkable ability to destroy just about any type of clothing with ease, needing only an hour or so of vigorous play, sometimes minutes. But in the 70s, they begrudgingly met their match. Catalog moguls, Sears and Roebuck, developed a new fabric that was nearly indestructible, perking up the ears of parents everywhere. They marketed the fabric in a line of children's clothing that every kid of the era surely remembers, either fondly or with a pained expression. That’s right, we're talking about Toughskins. Continue reading...

Toy Record Players

Toy Record Players

In a world where portable music devices are commonplace, it seems unfathomable that it wasn’t always possible for a youngster to play their favorite music in the confines of their bedroom. Sure, mom and dad had the fancy, expensive stereo in the living room but it wasn't exactly kid-friendly. One was likely to face the wrath of an angry parent if caught mishandling their prized phonograph collection. But, as usual, the toy industry came through to save the day, allowing children the same pleasures of the adult world. With the introduction of toy record players, now a kid could close the bedroom door and have complete control of their listening choices. The world would never be the same. Continue reading...

Trac-Ball

Trac-Ball

Jai-Alai, in Basque, means “Merry Festival.” The game originated there over a century ago and has been billed as the “world’s fastest ball game.” Of course, a part of that excitement and intensity comes from its infamous reputation for crippling players permanently. Not the case with Whamo-s version, called Trac-Ball. But that didn't mean that there weren't a few dangers worth watching out for. Perhaps its no wonder that this game is so fondly remembered. Let's take a look back at Trac-Ball. Continue reading...

Trix Rabbit

Trix Rabbit

Usually when one repeats the same task and yet expects a different result, it is a textbook example of insanity. But there are exceptions. When a generous helping of Trix cereal is involved, you can’t really blame that bunny for repeatedly trying to snag himself a bowl. In fact, it’s hard not to sympathize. And for all that effort, one thing is indisputable; Trix Rabbit has sold a heck of a lot of cereal over the years. Continue reading...

Trolls

Trolls

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, Troll Dolls have seemingly been around forever. Modern generations can thank the retro-crazed 90s for the resurgence of a more-brightly hued version of the little lucky toys, while older generations can thank Thomas Dam, a Danish woodcutter who, as legend has it, simply didn’t have enough money to buy his lovely daughter a toy. Rather than put on a sad face over the whole matter, Dam delved into Nordic fairy tales for a bit of inspiration and carved up a troll doll for his daughter. She loved it, dressed it up and showed it off to anyone that might take a look. Slowly but surely the ugly little doll won a spot within the hearts of the townspeople and thus, the beginning of the Troll Doll. Continue reading...

Trouble

Trouble

Sometimes the simplest of challenges are the ones most frustrating, which pretty much encapsulates a little board game called Trouble. Introduced by Kohner in 1965, it brought out the competitiveness in everyone who played, sometimes raising their stress levels to the point that the game maker thought it wise to protect the lone die behind a globe of plastic, lest it get flung across the room. Continue reading...