The Karate Kid

The Karate Kid

It is almost impossible to make a list of “feel good” movies and not have The Karate Kid somewhere at the top. This endearing film about an ill-tempered teen and his calm and wise mentor quickly became one of the biggest box-office successes of 1984 – thanks to audiences whose chose to not only see it once at the theaters, but often multiple times. It would spawn a trio of sequels, as well as a Saturday morning cartoon, earn an Acadamy Award nomination for actor Pat Morita (of Happy Days and Mr. T. and Tina fame) and prompt millions of moviegoers to imitate the traditional training method of “Wax on – Wax off.” Continue reading...

Keebler Elves

The Keebler Elves

With a taste so uncommonly good, it’s hard to believe that their delicious treats came from a hollowed-out tree. But not just any old tree - this one contained magical ovens, each one manned by the diminutive bakers known fondly to us as the Keebler Elves. And throughout their long history, they have continued to tantalize all who come within sight or smell of their irresistible specialty – cookies! Join us as we remember this trio of tree-dwelling mascots from yesteryear. Continue reading...

The Kids in the Hall

The Kids in the Hall

Perhaps one of the most endearing and yet, completely random sketch comedy shows to ever be broadcast, Kids in the Hall offered generous amounts of dark humor, surrealistic scenarios, and yes, a whole lot of acting in drag. All of this combined to make it a hit that has lived on perpetually in syndication, not to mention in the hearts of its loyal followers, ever since it was first broadcast on HBO in 1988. Continue reading...

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid

Disney's 28th animated motion picture marked the beginning of one era and the end of another. The Little Mermaid ushered in an animated Renaissance for the studio, sparking a string of hits that included Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King and more. The film was also the last fully cel-animated picture for the studio, as computers soon took over many of the animators' more menial tasks. Historical considerations aside, The Little Mermaid was plain old good fun, a somewhat loose adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale. Continue reading...

The Little Rascals

The Little Rascals

Between 1922 and 1948, comedic film director Hal Roach created a total of 220 film shorts under the name Our Gang. Featuring over 41 different child actors over the years, the beloved shorts chronicled the adventures of a group of children who lived in a poverty-stricken neighborhood together. In the early 50s, thanks to the enormous popularity of the series, MGM took 80 of the shorts and packaged them for television as The Little Rascals. And, in the decades that followed, millions of former kids sat mesmerized by the hilarious antics and colorful characters. A staple of syndicated television for many years, they still hold a fond place in our hearts. Continue reading...

The Littles

The Littles

Created by author John Peterson, The Littles were a series of popular children’s novels written in the late 60s and featured a family of tiny intelligent creatures that were part-human and part-rodent (evidenced by their long tails and mouse-like ears). In 1983, they emerged from the books to star in their very own Saturday morning cartoon series on ABC called, you guessed it, The Littles. Continue reading...

The Lost Boys

The Lost Boys

Long before Stephanie Meyer unleashed the Twilight book series to a teen audience thirsty for vampire tales, movie audiences were introduced to the sleepy coastal town of Santa Carla. It was within this community that teen heartthrobs and fanged villains waged war against one another in the beloved 1987 horror film, The Lost Boys. Continue reading...

The Monster Squad

The Monster Squad

Plenty of monsters have come and gone over the years, but it’s not often you get a collection of, count em’, five classic creatures in one movie. To experience this quintuplet of creeps, one must watch The Monster Squad. Released in 1987, the all-star team of terror included Frankenstein, Dracula, The Mummy, the Wolfman, and Gillman (from The Creature From the Black Lagoon, in case his name draws a blank.) That’s a lotta monster bang for the buck. Throw in a special appearance by Van Helsing, a few bad vampire babes and a bunch of monster-obsessed kids and you have the makings for a pretty cool movie. Continue reading...