ThunderCats

ThunderCats

A successful toy line inspired this feline saga of exploration, exile and betrayal, closely approximating daytime soap operas as much as Saturday morning cartoons. And the successful five-year run of ThunderCats on television endeared it to millions of fans, who remain fiercly loyal to this day. Continue reading...

Sesame Street

Sesame Street

Since 1969, just about every kid with access to a television can tell you "how to get, how to get to Sesame Street." Filled with all sorts of interesting people and lovable critters, this urban city block has been entertaining kids for decades while sneakily introducing them to all those letters and numbers long before they ever set foot on a school bus. Let's take a look back at the iconic educational program that still resonates in the hearts of anyone who ever watched. Continue reading...

Big Jim

Big Jim

As the Vietnam War raged on in the early 70's, the public had tired of their usual fondness for war-related toys. Heck, even G.I. Joe took on more of a Steve Irwin persona, choosing a life of rugged adventure over another tour of duty. But he was no match in the brawn department to the one and only Big Jim. This was a man's man - a sports hero, martial arts master and adventurer, all wrapped up in one beefy package. Continue reading...

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Double Dare

Nickelodeon brought green slime to the forefront of television with its 1986 program, Double Dare. A combination of quiz show and obstacle course, the kid’s network made sure to provide plenty of slime, jelly, syrup, and other forms of goo. Host Marc Summers started things off by having the two competing teams, decked out in safety helmets, start with a “physical challenge.” This consisted of pushing apples with their noses in a wheelbarrow race, throwing eggs to their partners who cracked them on their heads, or wrapping their partners in toilet paper. Whoever could finish the stunt first controlled the game. Once the first mess had been made, Summers introduced the teams with names like “Ghastly Goobers” and “Stud Muffins.” […] Continue reading...

Colonel Sanders

Colonel Sanders

When it comes to iconic characters in advertising history, most are fictitious, the product of someone’s vivid imagination. One colorful exception was Colonel Harland Sanders. Wearing his immaculate white suit, skinny tie and sporting his trademark goatee, Colonel Sanders professed the virtues of his plump juicy chicken, fried up with his secret “11 herbs and spices,” to anyone who would listen - and it turned out that millions did. Today, we honor the real man responsible for bringing Kentucky Fried Chicken to the dinner table. Continue reading...

Pee-Wee's Playhouse

Pee-Wee’s Playhouse

Pee-Wee’s Playhouse was just the kind of madcap, wacky kids show that adults could watch and not be bored to death. Pee-wee, aka Paul Reubens, utilized an arsenal of puppets, vintage cartoons, animation and guest stars to bombard tender young mind with as much surreal fun as half an hour could hold. The result is a children's show that remains beloved to this day by most anyone who ever tuned in. Let's take a look back at the wonderful world of Pee-Wee. Continue reading...

Pogo Stick

Pogo Sticks

It sounds like a story right out of Ripley’s Believe it or Not, and it probably contains more fiction than fact - but it’s still too good not to repeat for old time’s sake. In Burma, there lived a poor little shoeless girl named Pogo. Her bare feet made it too difficult to make her daily trek, along the muddy roads filled with jagged rocks, so she could pray at the local temple. Her father finally came upon a solution to her dilemma and fashioned a jumping stick so that she could propel herself over these various obstacles and strengthen her soul without sacrificing her soles. A worldly traveler named George Hansburg happened to witness this miraculous jumping stick in action during one of his trips and decided that the rest of the world could also benefit from Pogo’s jumping stick. Continue reading...

Mr. Microphone

Mr. Microphone

Few that watched television in the 70s could ever forget the presence of a man named Ron Popeil, who regularly hawked the products manufactured by his company, Ronco. A master of mail order merchandising in his day, Popiel gave the world such memorable devices as the Pocket Fisherman, the Veg-O-Matic (and plenty of other “O-Matic" gadgets) and the iconic Ginsu knives. But while all of these products were marketed toward adult audiences, there was one particular gizmo that was geared towards kids and teens, a little device known as Mr. Microphone. Continue reading...