Talking Pee-Wee

Talking Pee-Wee

When Pee Wee’s Big Adventure hit the big screen in 1985, everybody fell in love with the nerdy character created by comedian Paul Reubens. Due to the film’s box office success, Pee Wee Herman would soon delight children (and more than a few adults) with the critically-acclaimed Saturday morning show, Pee Wee’s Playhouse. The marketing machine soon kicked into high gear, with everything from lunchboxes to trading cards. None were as memorable, however, as the Talking Pee Wee doll. Continue reading...

Taxi

Taxi

Welcome to The Sunshine Cab Company, where the career aspirations of the taxi-driving employees sit as idle as a yellow cab parked along a deserted curb, just hoping to be noticed. And through their trials and tribulations, their triumphs, and more often, their failures, this collection of cab drivers delivered some of the most memorable and uproarious moments in the history of television sitcoms. Continue reading...

Tears for Fears

Tears For Fears

There are some bands that are easy to categorize by genre, or even sub-genre – perhaps never more so than the early 80s. If you weren’t defined as “synth rock” or “new wave,” you were probably exploring “adult contemporary” or “pomp rock.” But for one particular band, Tears For Fears, definitions don’t come easy. They might have fallen into any of the aforementioned categories, or, perhaps they simply created their own. One thing is for certain; their original sound and songwriting skills made them on of the most successful and popular bands to emerge from the era. Continue reading...

Teddy Ruxpin

Teddy Ruxpin

Imagine if one of Disney's Country Bears tired of pick-up trucks, hoedowns, and the sleepy town life, and skipped off to college where he took a few speech classes, studied English, music, caring and sharing, and you've just imagined Teddy Ruxpin, the first cybernetic stuffed animal. Let's take a look back, shall we? Continue reading...

Tempest

Tempest

Placing unsuspecting gamers right in the heart of a terrifying storm, Atari's Tempest offered a whole new perspective on video games. With dazzling color vector graphics (an arcade first), the game was set in a gravity well, a forced-perspective structure with your claw-like yellow "Blaster" skirting around the outer rim. Inside the blackness, hordes of enemies approached, slithering up and around the walls, ready to destroy you on contact. Continue reading...

Tetris

Tetris

Call it the Russian Revolution ... In 1987, software company Spectrum Holobyte, Inc., released a PC game designed by Russian programmer Alexey Pazhitnov. Dubbed Tetris (from the Greek word for "four"), the game was deceptively simple: Using seven different shapes, each made of four blocks, players tried to build complete rows at the bottom of the screen. But what appeared an easy task at first glance proved maddening once the pressure was on, which made this one addictive video game. Continue reading...

Thats Incredible

That’s Incredible!

The 70s brought us a number of reality-based talked shows that put the spotlight on individuals will interesting abilities or stories to tell. The first was Real People, which swiftly rose in the ratings and caught the attention of the competitors. In 1980, ABC answered with That's Incredible, a show that focused on those among us with extraordinary abilities. Continue reading...

The A-Team

The A-Team

You gotta love a show that tells you exactly what it’s about in the first 30 seconds of every episode. The above was narrated every week before the opening credits, followed by the distinctive staccato beat of the theme and, oh yes, machine gun rounds spelling out the ‘A’ in A-Team. One may even say that machine guns were the main instruments utilized in the show’s musical score. The series created by 80s wunderkind Stephen J. Cannell ran very successfully from 1983 to 1987, becoming an international hit and pop culture icon. Continue reading...