Def Leppard

Def Leppard

There are few bands that exemplified the 1980's quite like Def Leppard. Their combination of pop and metal had its finger on the pulse of 80's record buyers. The high-tech sound they pursued on their albums helped define pop-music recording techniques of the 80's. They were also one of the first bands to take advantage of the possibilities of MTV by creating a string of videos that played up their good looks and youthful appeal to help sell their records. As a result, they became internationally successful and their sound and style set the tone for many future pop/metal acts. Continue reading...

Lip Smackers

Lip Smackers

Since the 1970's, there hasn't been a girl alive who didn't succumb to the addictive flavors offered by Bonne Bell Lip Smackers. These generously-sized pushup tubes of lip gloss came in a dizzying array of delicious flavors that coated the lips in a heavenly goo, which was impossible not to lick off and then reapply every five minutes. Continue reading...

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New Kids on the Block

You would be hard-pressed to find a young girl in the late 80s who didn't have a New Kids on the Block poster on her wall or in her locker. They weren't the first boy band by any means, perhaps not even the most talented, but there is no denying that this group of Boston teens took the world by storm back in the day, filling the airwaves and countless concert halls with screaming fans, and paving the way for a plethora of groups that followed in their footsteps. Continue reading...

The Kids in the Hall

The Kids in the Hall

Perhaps one of the most endearing and yet, completely random sketch comedy shows to ever be broadcast, Kids in the Hall offered generous amounts of dark humor, surrealistic scenarios, and yes, a whole lot of acting in drag. All of this combined to make it a hit that has lived on perpetually in syndication, not to mention in the hearts of its loyal followers, ever since it was first broadcast on HBO in 1988. Continue reading...

Spice Girls

Spice Girls

Nobody could have predicted the monumental impact of the Spice Girls on the world of pop music. Their achievements are, in a word, astounding. With 55 million records sold around the world, and that’s thanks to a mere three albums, they are not only the most successful girl band of all time, they are the most successful English band to emerge since The Beatles. But, while their music represents the largest portion of their fame, they also managed a popular crossover into both films and television, all thanks to the provocative personalities of these five multi-talented women. Continue reading...

Seinfeld

Seinfeld

They called it "a show about nothing," but you'd be hard-pressed to stretch "nothing" into nine seasons of hit comedy. Really, Seinfeld was about everything: sex, parents, the buttons on your shirt, baked goods, cold cereal, "man hands," yada yada yada... It was the little things in life that mattered on Seinfeld. You would never see "a very special episode" about drugs or childbirth, and nobody ever, ever gave hugs. Continue reading...

Chuck E. Cheese

Chuck E. Cheese

The year was 1977, and the man who gave us Atari and Pong, Nolan Bushnell, realized that there weren’t enough family-oriented establishments with video games. To fill the void, he came up with an idea for a restaurant where kids and adults could eat and play together. Originally called Chuck E. Cheese’s Pizza Time Theater and located in San Jose, California, it was a small-time operation – a glorified pizza shop with animatronic characters on stage performing for the guests. Continue reading...

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Dynamite

If you were a kid of the 70s and 80s, there’s a pretty good chance that you remember Dynamite magazine. One of the most popular kids-oriented publications of the era, Dynamite was where you learned about your favorite celebrities and teen idols, played games and puzzles, and got some really cool stuff, like a 3D King Kong poster (glasses included). Published from 1974-1992, and distributed by schoolteachers through Scholastic Press, Dynamite was a magazine that most every kid wanted to check out for at least a few minutes, and if you didn’t order your very own issue, you tried to borrow (or steal) a friend's copy. Continue reading...