Spice Girls

Spice Girls

Nobody could have predicted the monumental impact of the Spice Girls on the world of pop music. Their achievements are, in a word, astounding. With 55 million records sold around the world, and that’s thanks to a mere three albums, they are not only the most successful girl band of all time, they are the most successful English band to emerge since The Beatles. But, while their music represents the largest portion of their fame, they also managed a popular crossover into both films and television, all thanks to the provocative personalities of these five multi-talented women. Continue reading...

Seinfeld

Seinfeld

They called it "a show about nothing," but you'd be hard-pressed to stretch "nothing" into nine seasons of hit comedy. Really, Seinfeld was about everything: sex, parents, the buttons on your shirt, baked goods, cold cereal, "man hands," yada yada yada... It was the little things in life that mattered on Seinfeld. You would never see "a very special episode" about drugs or childbirth, and nobody ever, ever gave hugs. Continue reading...

Chuck E. Cheese

Chuck E. Cheese

The year was 1977, and the man who gave us Atari and Pong, Nolan Bushnell, realized that there weren’t enough family-oriented establishments with video games. To fill the void, he came up with an idea for a restaurant where kids and adults could eat and play together. Originally called Chuck E. Cheese’s Pizza Time Theater and located in San Jose, California, it was a small-time operation – a glorified pizza shop with animatronic characters on stage performing for the guests. Continue reading...

DynamiteMag-CountMorbidaFinal

Dynamite

If you were a kid of the 70s and 80s, there’s a pretty good chance that you remember Dynamite magazine. One of the most popular kids-oriented publications of the era, Dynamite was where you learned about your favorite celebrities and teen idols, played games and puzzles, and got some really cool stuff, like a 3D King Kong poster (glasses included). Published from 1974-1992, and distributed by schoolteachers through Scholastic Press, Dynamite was a magazine that most every kid wanted to check out for at least a few minutes, and if you didn’t order your very own issue, you tried to borrow (or steal) a friend's copy. Continue reading...

crystalpepsi

Crystal Pepsi

Competition has always been the name of the game in the cola beverage industry, with the two giants, Coke and Pepsi consistently trying to capture more of the other's market with new and innovative soft drinks. It's a risky endeavor to be sure, a primary example being the highly-touted New Coke, which fizzled quickly and became an embarrassment for the company. And on the other side of the aisle, the competition will always be remembered for the grandiose introduction, yet short history, of Crystal Pepsi. Continue reading...

atropop

Astro Pop

The Space Age was in full swing after World War II. Swift technological progress and widespread economic growth gave birth to a culture in love with rockets, space stations, and dreams of life on the moon. Every kid wanted to be an astronaut, and every week, a new toy or TV show was there to feed that dream.Spangler Candy of Bryan, Ohio, (founded in 1906) met this demand with the snazzy, rocket-shaped Astro Pop. This lollipop, a thin inverted cone of hard candy on stick, suggested a three-stage rocket: a red cherry-flavored lower section, a dark green lime middle, and a long yellow tip of lemon. Continue reading...

hippos

Hungry Hungry Hippos

Scientists claim that hippos (Hippopotamus amphibious) are herbivores, but millions of kids can attest otherwise. Their experience suggests that these gentle beasts have an insatiable appetite for little white marbles. Many a feeding frenzy has been observed during the course of a rousing round of Hungry Hungry Hippo. Continue reading...

schoolhouserock

Schoolhouse Rock

When it comes to scholastic studies, most kids loathe having to memorize things. When it comes to song lyrics, however, most kids can master them after only hearing the words a handful of times. With this in mind, Schoolhouse Rock debuted in 1972, catching children off-guard with their infectious little tunes that taught important lessons about history, science and grammar - without most kids ever realizing what was going on. How well did it work? Well, decades later, many of us can still remember the lyrics to some of our favorite Schoolhouse Rock segments as if it were yesterday. Let’s take a look back at these perpetually-popular educational shorts. Continue reading...