DynamiteMag-CountMorbidaFinal

Dynamite

If you were a kid of the 70s and 80s, there’s a pretty good chance that you remember Dynamite magazine. One of the most popular kids-oriented publications of the era, Dynamite was where you learned about your favorite celebrities and teen idols, played games and puzzles, and got some really cool stuff, like a 3D King Kong poster (glasses included). Published from 1974-1992, and distributed by schoolteachers through Scholastic Press, Dynamite was a magazine that most every kid wanted to check out for at least a few minutes, and if you didn’t order your very own issue, you tried to borrow (or steal) a friend's copy. Continue reading...

crystalpepsi

Crystal Pepsi

Competition has always been the name of the game in the cola beverage industry, with the two giants, Coke and Pepsi consistently trying to capture more of the other's market with new and innovative soft drinks. It's a risky endeavor to be sure, a primary example being the highly-touted New Coke, which fizzled quickly and became an embarrassment for the company. And on the other side of the aisle, the competition will always be remembered for the grandiose introduction, yet short history, of Crystal Pepsi. Continue reading...

atropop

Astro Pop

The Space Age was in full swing after World War II. Swift technological progress and widespread economic growth gave birth to a culture in love with rockets, space stations, and dreams of life on the moon. Every kid wanted to be an astronaut, and every week, a new toy or TV show was there to feed that dream.Spangler Candy of Bryan, Ohio, (founded in 1906) met this demand with the snazzy, rocket-shaped Astro Pop. This lollipop, a thin inverted cone of hard candy on stick, suggested a three-stage rocket: a red cherry-flavored lower section, a dark green lime middle, and a long yellow tip of lemon. Continue reading...

hippos

Hungry Hungry Hippos

Scientists claim that hippos (Hippopotamus amphibious) are herbivores, but millions of kids can attest otherwise. Their experience suggests that these gentle beasts have an insatiable appetite for little white marbles. Many a feeding frenzy has been observed during the course of a rousing round of Hungry Hungry Hippo. Continue reading...

schoolhouserock

Schoolhouse Rock

When it comes to scholastic studies, most kids loathe having to memorize things. When it comes to song lyrics, however, most kids can master them after only hearing the words a handful of times. With this in mind, Schoolhouse Rock debuted in 1972, catching children off-guard with their infectious little tunes that taught important lessons about history, science and grammar - without most kids ever realizing what was going on. How well did it work? Well, decades later, many of us can still remember the lyrics to some of our favorite Schoolhouse Rock segments as if it were yesterday. Let’s take a look back at these perpetually-popular educational shorts. Continue reading...

HydroxFinal

Hydrox

The cookie world, as you might imagine, is just a tad competitive, and when it comes to two chocolate wafers embracing a layer of sweet vanilla crème, there has always been a heavyweight and an underdog. We know you are aware of the former, but for the uninitiated, we would like to talk about the latter, and thy name is Hydrox. While their demise can be directly linked to their Nabisco counterpart, they are the cookie of choice of millions of people who, in 2008, demanded their cookie back. Let’s see what all the fuss was about. Continue reading...

WoodsyOwlFinal

Woodsy Owl

He sports a hat reminiscent of Robin Hood, his matching pants as forest green as his message. He is an official spokes-owl for the National Forest Service and his name is Woodsy. And, for the last four decades, he has probably done more to spread the word about environmentalism than even Al Gore. Continue reading...

SoulTrainFinal

Soul Train

Ever since its debut in 1952, fans of American pop music could tune in weekly to American Bandstand and keep themselves current on all of the latest artists and trends. But it would be almost two decades later before fans of rhythm and blues were given their own weekly outlet. They would forever owe their thanks to a Chicago DJ named Don Cornelius, the creator of Soul Train, for letting their voices be heard. Soul Train showcased all of the up-and-coming artists of the genre, put a spotlight on all the current dance moves, and, very quickly, became an enduring hit. Continue reading...