My Pet Monster

My Pet Monster

The considerable plush toy market, for better or worse, tends to market their wares towards the female youngsters. One of the few exceptions was My Pet Monster, released in 1986, which aimed to pick up the slack in the boy's market. It didn't really matter though - kids of both genders couldn’t help but take a liking to this furry and fanged friend, simply because he was too cool to ignore. Continue reading...

Kid Power

Kid Power

In 1965, cartoonist Morrie Turner introduced his popular newspaper comic strip, Wee Pals, which focused on a collection of multicultural kids called “The Rainbow Club.” And, although a portion of society was a wee bit uncomfortable with the socially conscious subject matter at the time, it was hard to deny that the cartoon was, above all, funny – funny enough, in fact, to lead ABC to base a Saturday morning animated series on the comic strip called Kid Power. Continue reading...

Laverne and Shirley

Laverne and Shirley

Any successful television series is likely to have a spin-off or two, and the enormously popular Happy Days was no exception. But, while most spin-offs are lucky if they last a full season, this time lightning struck twice. Following the lives of two lovable brewery workers who lived in 1950s-era Milwaukee, Laverne and Shirley won the hearts of television viewers almost immediately and enjoyed a longevity that few spin-offs have ever managed to achieve. Continue reading...

Eight is Enough

Eight is Enough

Not even the Brady family could rival the enormity of the Bradford brood. Eight is Enough chronicled all of the trials and tribulations of a father trying his best to raise his eight children. Sometimes funny, sometimes heartbreaking – the show quickly charmed the hearts of viewers across the country, especially those who had grown up in large families of their own. Continue reading...

Jonny Quest

Jonny Quest

Just about every kid of the 70s, at least those who had access to a TV on Saturday morning, remembers Jonny Quest. The reason is simple: there was hardly a time that the Hanna-Barbera produced series wasn’t on TV. From 1967 through most of the 70s, and even into the 80s, kids have been following the adventures of Johnny and his pals. That’s some surprising longevity considering that only 26 episodes of the original animated series were ever produced. Continue reading...

Starsky and Hutch

Starsky and Hutch

In the mid-70s, action movies were upping the ante as far as acceptable levels of violence, with films like Dirty Harry redefining the role of the fictional cop. Soon after, the normally timid medium of television decided that they needed to respond in kind if they wanted to attract the audiences that were flocking to see this new era of films. ABC decided that the calm days of Adam-12 and Dragnet were over. There were two new cops on the beat that didn’t take crap from anyone and weren’t shy about drawing their guns and firing off a couple dozen rounds. Their names were Starsky and Hutch. Continue reading...

The Mod Squad

The Mod Squad

There was certainly no shortage of police dramas on 60s television, but they lacked the appeal necessary to capture the devotion of younger audiences who were becoming more turned off by the persona of the typical “square” authority figures. To try to capture some youthful television viewer attention, ABC responded with perhaps the hippest cop show to ever hit the airwaves. Centered on a trio of former juvenile delinquents who become undercover cops, these cocky and fashionable fighters of crime would be forever known as The Mod Squad. Continue reading...

Fantasy Island

Fantasy Island

Imagine a mysterious tropical island where visitors come to have their fantasies played out. If that sounds enticing, you are not alone. For seven seasons, television viewers checked in on the inhabitants of Fantasy Island every Saturday night, watching them live out their dreams, for better or worse, under the watchful eye of their enigmatic host, Mr. Rourke and his assistant, Tattoo. Continue reading...