Jonny Quest

Jonny Quest

Just about every kid of the 70s, at least those who had access to a TV on Saturday morning, remembers Jonny Quest. The reason is simple: there was hardly a time that the Hanna-Barbera produced series wasn’t on TV. From 1967 through most of the 70s, and even into the 80s, kids have been following the adventures of Johnny and his pals. That’s some surprising longevity considering that only 26 episodes of the original animated series were ever produced. Continue reading...

Starsky and Hutch

Starsky and Hutch

In the mid-70s, action movies were upping the ante as far as acceptable levels of violence, with films like Dirty Harry redefining the role of the fictional cop. Soon after, the normally timid medium of television decided that they needed to respond in kind if they wanted to attract the audiences that were flocking to see this new era of films. ABC decided that the calm days of Adam-12 and Dragnet were over. There were two new cops on the beat that didn’t take crap from anyone and weren’t shy about drawing their guns and firing off a couple dozen rounds. Their names were Starsky and Hutch. Continue reading...

The Mod Squad

The Mod Squad

There was certainly no shortage of police dramas on 60s television, but they lacked the appeal necessary to capture the devotion of younger audiences who were becoming more turned off by the persona of the typical “square” authority figures. To try to capture some youthful television viewer attention, ABC responded with perhaps the hippest cop show to ever hit the airwaves. Centered on a trio of former juvenile delinquents who become undercover cops, these cocky and fashionable fighters of crime would be forever known as The Mod Squad. Continue reading...

Fantasy Island

Fantasy Island

Imagine a mysterious tropical island where visitors come to have their fantasies played out. If that sounds enticing, you are not alone. For seven seasons, television viewers checked in on the inhabitants of Fantasy Island every Saturday night, watching them live out their dreams, for better or worse, under the watchful eye of their enigmatic host, Mr. Rourke and his assistant, Tattoo. Continue reading...

Battle of the Network Stars

Battle of the Network Stars

Remember back when there were only three major networks on TV? It seems so long ago. There were ABC, NBC and CBS and each network fought vigorously for their slice of the pie. And while viewers might not have been privy to the cutthroat nature of the business behind the scenes, they were at least able to get a glimpse of their favorite stars try to best each other on The Battle of the Network Stars. Continue reading...

Dynomutt, Dog Wonder

Dynomutt, Dog Wonder

Any regular watcher of television will tell you that a dog is man’s best friend. They will also attest that nifty gadgets are a crime-fighter’s best friend. So, what if we had a dog who was a loyal pet and sidekick to a crime fighting millionaire? Logic suggests that he would be equipped with plenty of high-tech sophistication. Such was the case with Dynomutt, a lovable but ever-clumsy canine robot, equipped with an array of gear that would make the future Inspector Gadget a tad jealous. Continue reading...

The Brady Bunch Hour

The Brady Bunch Hour

For seemingly any popular entertainer in the 70s who could sing and dance a little, perhaps even pull off some sketch comedy, their fate was clear – variety show! Tony Orlando, Sonny and Cher, Donny and Marie, Andy Williams: they all had them. And if they could do it, so could those lovable moppets, the Brady Bunch, stars of their very own variety series, The Brady Bunch Hour. Thanks to a well-received special produced by The Krofft brothers (Sid and Marty, that is), The Brady Bunch Hour was given the go ahead and made its debut in 1977. The entire groovy gang was there with the exception of Eve Plumb, who played Jan on the series. She said “thanks, but […] Continue reading...

Evel Knievel

Evel Knievel

It was just about impossible to be a kid in the 70s and not know who Evel Knievel was. He was the iconic folk hero of a generation that grew up a little too late to catch the space race or Daniel Boone. Eyes were transfixed to television sets everywhere each time he would put on his helmet and propel his motorcycle towards a ramp that would send him flying over cars, buses, fountains, canyons, and anything else that seemed to have a need to be jumped over. Of course, part of the allure of these spectacles was that Mr. Knieval didn’t always make the most graceful landing. Continue reading...