Pong

Pong

Pong wasn't the first commercial video game but it sure was the most successful, ushering in the first generation of electronic arcade games. Developed by video game guru Nolan Bushnell, Pong became the foundation for Bushnell's legendary Atari company and ground zero for an industry about to explode. Continue reading...

Chuck E. Cheese

Chuck E. Cheese

The year was 1977, and the man who gave us Atari and Pong, Nolan Bushnell, realized that there weren’t enough family-oriented establishments with video games. To fill the void, he came up with an idea for a restaurant where kids and adults could eat and play together. Originally called Chuck E. Cheese’s Pizza Time Theater and located in San Jose, California, it was a small-time operation – a glorified pizza shop with animatronic characters on stage performing for the guests. Continue reading...

Blip electronic game

Blip

When Atari released Pong in 1972, the immediate popularity of this electronic version of table tennis would give birth to an entire video game industry. A few years later, the game would become one of the first available on the newly emerging home game systems. But, what if you didn't have one of those expensive systems? Furthermore, what if you wanted to play this game on a road trip or in a school cafeteria? The solution was a small handheld game called Blip. Released by Tomy in 1977, Blip was portable and certainly challenging. But, in the truest sense of the word, it wasn't really a video game; it just looked like one. Let's take a look back. Continue reading...

Colecovision

ColecoVision

Perhaps one the most ambitious home video game systems ever contrived, ColecoVision took the world by storm in the early 80s, offering an enthusiastic public seemingly everything under the sun. Unfortunately, the only thing quicker than its ascent was its decline due to promises not kept. For the couple of years it was around though, ColecoVision made quite the mark, and is still fondly remembered to this day. Continue reading...

Canyon Bomber

Canyon Bomber

The names of early arcade games left little doubt as to what the player’s responsibilities would entail. Lunar Lander meant sheer frustration as you tried to set down on the moon’s surface. Asteroids put you in deep space, shooting madly at the rocky obstacles bent on destroying you. And with a name like Canyon Bomber, your mission was crystal clear – you were going to bomb some canyons. Let's take a look back at this 1978 offering from Atari. Continue reading...

Indy 800 arcade game

Indy 800

When Atari released their first attempt at a racing game in 1974, called Gran Track 10, the response was somewhat underwhelming. Undaunted, they forged forward the following year with the much more ambitious Indy 800. This time around, the game allowed up to eight players to compete simultaneously against each other and the notorious clock. A steady stream of quarters would soon follow, making this one of the most popular racing games of the 70s. Continue reading...

Gauntlet arcade game

Gauntlet

Roleplay and dungeons gained much popularity in the 1980s and naturally, arcade games cashed in on the trend. Being one of the first games to accommodate from one to four simultaneous players, Gauntlet featured a sprawling set of mazes through which the characters wandered and slew monsters. The arcade community embraced the game with open arms and filled each machine with a steady supply of quarters. Continue reading...

Atari Fire Truck

Fire Truck

Where's the fire? Well, there was no fire, just a fire truck that had to be steered around roads full of obstacles in the 1978 Atari game. The player(s) had to steer a fire truck through the winding streets, accumulating points and--hopefully--earning extended play with a high enough score. Continue reading...