Speed Racer

Speed Racer

Of all of the animated shows to come out of Japan in the 60s, there is none more fondly remembered than Mach Go Go Go, which followed the adventures of a dashing young race car driver. If it doesn’t ring a bell, perhaps you know it by its American title, Speed Racer. Continue reading...

Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

Unlike Trix cereal, cartoons aren't always for kids. The Flintstones, created by Hanna-Barbera, blazed the prime-time animation trail in the 60s, proving that a cartoon series could hold its own against some live-action competition. In the 70s, Hanna-Barbera tried again with Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, a show about a typical family with a few issues. And, much like The Flintstones borrowed from The Honeymooners, the new show was inspired by the much more controversial sitcom, All in the Family. Continue reading...

BlackCauldronFinal

The Black Cauldron

If you are searching for a story from which to make a successful animated film, there are certain elements that you can’t go wrong with - swords and a bit of sorcery (couldn’t hurt), a battle between good and evil (now you’re talking), a brave young hero on a quest to save the world (gotta have it) and, of course, a psychic pig (Right? Right?). Put all these ingredients in a pot, give it a good stir, and the result is The Black Cauldron, an 1985 animated Disney film based on Lloyd Alexander’s fantasy book series, The Chronicles of Prydain. Continue reading...

Inch High Private Eye

Inch High Private Eye

Don Adams, who brought Maxwell Smart to life in Get Smart, would later give voice to a trenchcoat-wearing crime fighter named Inspector Gadget. But a decade earlier, another diminutive cartoon detective's voice also bore an uncanny resemblance. Only this time, it wasn’t Adams, but someone doing an impersonation of Maxwell Smart. His name was Inch High Private Eye. Continue reading...

Speed Buggy

Speed Buggy

The public has always shown affection towards cars that have the ability to converse. As a result, sitcoms, action shows and family films have repeatedly used some form of chatty chassis to delight viewers. It was only a matter of time before kids had some talking transportation on Saturday mornings to enjoy, thanks to the creative minds at Hanna-Barbera and the animated Speed Buggy. Continue reading...

The Groovie Goolies

The Groovie Goolies

With the overwhelming success of The Archies on Saturday mornings, Filmation decided to offer a similar show with monstrous results. The Groovie Goolies, an animated collection of decidedly hipper versions of the famous movie monsters of yesteryear were paired with some new friends. Featured alongside Sabrina, The Teenage Witch, Sabrina and the Groovie Goolies debuted in 1970. A year later, the ghoulish gang finally got their own show, The Groovie Goolies. Continue reading...

The Jetsons

The Jetsons

After Hanna-Barbera proved that a prime-time cartoon sitcom set in the Stone Age could be successful, they set their sites on the faraway mid-21st century. In the middle of a futuristic world where flying cars buzzed the skies and robotic maids tended to the chores, they plopped down a typical family, The Jetsons. Continue reading...

Garfield and Friends

Garfield and Friends

When it comes to lazy felines, few can match Garfield. Created by cartoonist, Jim Davis, the syndicated comic strip proved so popular that it was only a matter of time before the crotchety cat transitioned to television commercials, then his own Saturday morning show, called Garfield and Friends. First airing in 1988, the endearing character went on to appear in over 130 episodes. Continue reading...