CB Bears

CB Bears

Like pet rocks and mood rings, the Citizen's Band radio craze hit the 70's hard and fast. Spurred on by the success of the C.W. McCall song "Convoy," the popularity of C.B. radios skyrocketed, moving from truckers' rigs into private residences. The cries of "Breaker, Breaker" and "10-4 Good Buddy" could be heard for miles around. The song inspired a movie starring Kris Kristofferson and Ernest Borgnine, and eventually the craze manifested itself in a Saturday morning cartoon called CB Bears. Continue reading...

Harlem Globetrotters

Harlem Globetrotters

In the 70s, one needn’t even be a hoops fan to know who the Harlem Globetrotters were. Formed in 1927 by millionaire Abe Saperstein, the Globetrotters were heralded around the world for their acrobatic and gravity-defying antics on the court. Whistling “Sweet Georgia Brown” all along the way, their celebrity appeal soared to slam-dunking heights and a Saturday morning cartoon show soon followed. Continue reading...

Monchhichi

Monchhichi

In the mid-70s, the Japanese unleashed the cuddly, thumb sucking monkeys called Monchhichi on an unsuspecting world. But it wasn’t until 1980, when Hanna-Barbera decided to follow up their decidedly cute Saturday morning offering, The Smurfs, with another adorable addition. Working with Mattel Toys, the two conspired to bring the lovable Monchhichi to the airwaves and, of course, the toy stores. Continue reading...

Super Friends

Super Friends

Most kids have a superhero they identify with. Problem is, each used to have their own individual shows and there just wasn’t enough time on Saturday morning for every hero to get a time slot - meaning some young Aquaman fan was probably out of luck. The solution was to put them all together, and that’s precisely what Hanna-Barbera did in 1973, under the umbrella of Super Friends. All the favorites were there – Superman, Batman and Robin, Wonder Woman, even Aquaman, plus a few up-and-coming prospects from the minor leagues. Continue reading...

Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

Unlike Trix cereal, cartoons aren't always for kids. The Flintstones, created by Hanna-Barbera, blazed the prime-time animation trail in the 60s, proving that a cartoon series could hold its own against some live-action competition. In the 70s, Hanna-Barbera tried again with Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, a show about a typical family with a few issues. And, much like The Flintstones borrowed from The Honeymooners, the new show was inspired by the much more controversial sitcom, All in the Family. Continue reading...

bananasplits

The Banana Splits

Just about every former kid who grew up in the late 60s has fond recollections of The Banana Splits. With a format loosely based upon the popular prime-time show, Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In, The Banana Splits combined live-action, psychedelic rock music and classic animation, all offered up with a generous helping of both short comedic sketches and lengthier episodic features. Continue reading...

Scooby Doo

Scooby Doo

Don't ever let them tell you that your personal challenges will keep you from reaching your dreams. We of Generation TV know better, because we've watched a dog with a truly brutal speech impediment become the longest-running cartoon star in network TV history. If Scooby-Doo can do it, then by golly so can you. Continue reading...

My Pet Monster

My Pet Monster

The considerable plush toy market, for better or worse, tends to market their wares towards the female youngsters. One of the few exceptions was My Pet Monster, released in 1986, which aimed to pick up the slack in the boy's market. It didn't really matter though - kids of both genders couldn’t help but take a liking to this furry and fanged friend, simply because he was too cool to ignore. Continue reading...