The Brady Bunch Hour

The Brady Bunch Hour

For seemingly any popular entertainer in the 70s who could sing and dance a little, perhaps even pull off some sketch comedy, their fate was clear – variety show! Tony Orlando, Sonny and Cher, Donny and Marie, Andy Williams: they all had them. And if they could do it, so could those lovable moppets, the Brady Bunch, stars of their very own variety series, The Brady Bunch Hour. Thanks to a well-received special produced by The Krofft brothers (Sid and Marty, that is), The Brady Bunch Hour was given the go ahead and made its debut in 1977. The entire groovy gang was there with the exception of Eve Plumb, who played Jan on the series. She said “thanks, but […] Continue reading...

Little House on the Prairie

Little House on the Prairie

For nine seasons, television viewers tuned in to follow the travels, trials and tribulation of the Ingalls family as they made a life for themselves in the American frontier on Little House on the Prairie. Loosely based upon the popular series of Little House books by author Laura Ingalls Wilder, the weekly prime-time adventures of the Ingalls family proved to be a huge hit for NBC. Continue reading...

Quantum Leap

Quantum Leap

Oh, boy. Nobody can resist a time-travel story, especially when the sci-fi aspect is toned down in favor of drama. Quantum Leap, which debuted in 1989 on NBC, put a unique twist on time-travel, having the main character, Dr. Sam Beckett, actually inhabit the bodies of various people living in the past. That included women, kids and, in one memorable episode, a chimp. Thanks to compelling plots and a wonderful chemistry between Sam and his sidekick, Al, Quantum Leap won the hearts of many a TV viewer. Continue reading...

The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams

The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams

The idea of escaping the pressures of civilized society in favor of a solitary life in the wilderness is a captivating one. In the 70s, the poster child for such an adventurer was a bearded mountain man with a smiling face named Grizzly Adams. First introduced by way of a a novel in 1972, the cinematic version of The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams came out in theaters two years later and captured the hearts of millions, making Grizzly Adams a household name throughout the remainder of the decade. Continue reading...

The Greatest American Hero

The Greatest American Hero

Despite the earnestness of the theme song (which went to number one on the singles charts), The Greatest American Hero never took itself too seriously. William Katt starred as mild-mannered high-school teacher Ralph Hinkley, who, while on a desert field trip with his Whitney High students, was chosen by aliens to don a costume and fight bad guys (now that's a field trip!). Witnessing this first encounter was FBI agent Bill Maxwell, who happened to be stranded in the same part of the desert. Continue reading...

Knight Rider

Knight Rider

After the short-lived sitcom from the 60s, My Mother the Car, television viewers would have to wait almost two decades before a network ventured into talking car territory again as part of the prime time lineup. It was worth the wait, and NBC scored a big hit with a talking car named K.I.T.T in the weekly 80s series Knight Rider. Continue reading...

My Two Dads

My Two Dads

It is often said that two is better than one. And for a young girl named Nicole Bradford, the old adage would be put to the test. With the untimely death of her mother, she learned that mom had been splitting her romantic time between two men, and furthermore, both were awarded custody of the girl. Such was the premise of the 80s television sitcom, My Two Dads. Continue reading...

Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Traditionally, when a film is only marginally successful at the box office, the likelihood of it ever spawning a television series is slim at best. Even more rare is when anyone associated with such a film decides to make the transition into television. But Buffy the Vampire Slayer apparently wasn’t concerned by these preconceptions, because it proceeded to render them null. Not only was this 90s series far more successful than the original film, it also had creator and screenwriter Joss Whedon at the helm. Traditions be damned. Continue reading...