Speed Racer

Speed Racer

Of all of the animated shows to come out of Japan in the 60s, there is none more fondly remembered than Mach Go Go Go, which followed the adventures of a dashing young race car driver. If it doesn’t ring a bell, perhaps you know it by its American title, Speed Racer. Continue reading...

The Rifleman

The Rifleman

Nobody on television ever worked a Winchester with as much agility and speed as Chuck Connors. For five years, viewers tuned in weekly to watch TV's first single parent fight off an endless supply of bad guys, thanks to his trusty firearm, on the beloved ABC series, The Rifleman. Continue reading...

The Odd Couple

The Odd Couple

Compulsive neatness first matched wits with advanced slobbery on the Broadway stage in the popular Neil Simon play, The Odd Couple. The formula worked just as well on the big screen in 1968, so ABC decided to give it a shot as a sitcom two years later. Starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman, the tale of two divorced polar opposites sharing an apartment together proceeded to win the hearts of millions. Continue reading...

Beakman's World

Beakman’s World

In the 50s, there was Mr. Wizard’s World to explain the ways of science to young television viewers. The torch, or Bunsen burner, as it were, was passed in the 90s to Beakman’s World, an educational series featuring a scientist with humongous hair named Beakman, who would answer questions sent in by young viewers. Continue reading...

Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

Unlike Trix cereal, cartoons aren't always for kids. The Flintstones, created by Hanna-Barbera, blazed the prime-time animation trail in the 60s, proving that a cartoon series could hold its own against some live-action competition. In the 70s, Hanna-Barbera tried again with Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, a show about a typical family with a few issues. And, much like The Flintstones borrowed from The Honeymooners, the new show was inspired by the much more controversial sitcom, All in the Family. Continue reading...

American Gladiators

American Gladiators

While most game shows catered to the intellectually-advanced, there weren’t many opportunities for the jock types to parlay their physical talents into cash and prizes. American Gladiators gave them a few moments of televised glory. In this popular 90s show, it didn’t matter whether you knew the capital of Wisconsin, as long as you could outwhack your opponent with a giant Q-tip. Continue reading...

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Soul Train

Ever since its debut in 1952, fans of American pop music could tune in weekly to American Bandstand and keep themselves current on all of the latest artists and trends. But it would be almost two decades later before fans of rhythm and blues were given their own weekly outlet. They would forever owe their thanks to a Chicago DJ named Don Cornelius, the creator of Soul Train, for letting their voices be heard. Soul Train showcased all of the up-and-coming artists of the genre, put a spotlight on all the current dance moves, and, very quickly, became an enduring hit. Continue reading...

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The Twilight Zone

Television took a turn towards the surreal in 1959, thanks to a new anthology series called The Twilight Zone. Delving into such areas as science fiction, drama, comedy, horror or political commentary - the only thing to be expected from each episode was the unexpected. Famous for last minute twists, the series success is due to the genius of its creator, writer and host, Rod Serling, who imagined some of the most engaging stories ever to hit the airwaves. Continue reading...