robinhoodfeature

Robin Hood

Sly like a fox, that Robin Hood was. So, when Disney decided to bring the epic adventure to the big screen in animated form, they indeed gave the role to an anthropomorphic fox. And they found critters to play each of the famous roles. Marian was also a fox, Prince John and King Richard became lions. Little John was now a bear, Friar Tuck was a badger, and the sinister Sheriff of Nottingham was a wolf - in Walt Disney’s classic 1973 film, Robin Hood. Continue reading...

Peter Pan

Peter Pan

Walt Disney long held an affinity for Sir James M. Barrie’s classic children’s book Peter Pan. But even though he acquired the story rights in 1939, it would take until 1953 before his imaginative interpretation would enthrall theater audiences. Some six decades later, audiences of all ages remain hooked on this animated masterpiece. Continue reading...

Smokey Bear

Smokey Bear

With World War II raging away, natural resources needed protection at all costs. A forest fire could be devastating in terms of lost lumber. The government handed a very special bear the task of informing the public about the dangers of fire and the need for watchful vigilance. And for over 60 years, he has proven himself worthy of the task. He is Smokey Bear and his contributions to the war effort and beyond have made him a legend. Continue reading...

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

The concept of “bumbling inventor” was a tried and true formula for Disney, dating all the way back to The Absent-Minded Professor. In 1989, they would dust off the concept and cast Rick Moranis in the role of eccentric genius. The result was the highly-successful Honey, I Shrunk the Kids. Continue reading...

Petes-Dragon

Pete’s Dragon

With the popularity of films like Mary Poppins and Song of the South, Disney proved that they could successfully mix live-action and animation. For their next such endeavor, they would once again meld the two mediums in 1977 for Pete’s Dragon, a comedic film about a boy and his invisible, fire-breathing friend. Continue reading...

Song of the South

Song of the South

The “Uncle Remus” stories penned by Joel Chandler Harris provided a perfect vehicle for Walt Disney to employ a technology he had long experimented with – the merging of animation with live actors. The cartoon pioneer first explored the possibilities in a short called Alice’s Wonderland as far back as 1923. It was finally time to put the techniques to the real test in a feature film, the result of which was The Song of the South. Continue reading...

Ludwig Von Drake

Ludwig Von Drake

There seems to be an unwritten rule that anyone who is a genius must also be eccentric. The same holds true for the duck with all the answers, Ludwig Von Drake. While he may never have possessed the same star power as his beloved nephew, Donald, he made a name for himself in many classic Disney offerings. Continue reading...