Hawaiian Punch

Hawaiian Punch

Until the 1980s, commercial-watching consumers could catch the striped-shirt wearing mascot, Punchy, popping the unsuspecting tourist Opie/Oaf after offering him a nice Hawaiian Punch. Punchy’s fisticuff days are a thing of the past, but that ruby-red concoction many of us have grown to love over the years remains as popular as ever. For over 60s years, Hawaiian Punch has set the standard for fruit punch flavor using Polynesian flavors such as pineapple, guava, papaya and passion fruit (as well as other less-exotic additions, such as apple, orange and apricot), packing quite the punch for fans and aficionados of this luscious libation throughout the years. A.W. Leo, Tom Yates and Ralph Harrison are credited with creating the recipe for Hawaiian Punch […] Continue reading...

Donkey Kong Cereals

Donkey Kong Cereals

It’s certainly no surprise that manufacturers of kid’s breakfast cereals have found much of their success by tying their product to popular cultural icons, such as television cartoons. But with the rapid rise in the popularity of video games in the early 80s, these computer-generated mascots were able to get in on the action as well. And with a game as enormously popular as Donkey Kong, few were suprised when a breakfast cereal soon followed. Unfortunately, its rightful place in the supermarket aisle was short lived. Continue reading...

Pez candy

Pez

Many toys have come and gone over the years, but create one that spits out candy every time you play with it and you've got a sure winner. Better yet, offer a vast selection of dispensers modeled after just about every pop culture icon to ever exist, each filled to the brim with a stack of yummy fruit-flavored confections, and you're assured to win the heart of every kid (and collector) in existence. Yes, today our focus is on Pez candy. Continue reading...

Mr T Cereal

Mr. T Cereal

Most Americans got their first look at Laurence Tureaud (aka: Mr T.) in 1982, when the brawny, mohawk-laden former bouncer appeared in Rocky IV, as Rocky Balboa's formidable boxing opponent, Clubber Lang. Kids took notice of the T-man the following year, when he appeared as B.A. "Bad Attitude" Baracus on the hugely-succesful television series, The A-Team. It didn't take long for network execs to realize his pre-teen popularity and give him his own Saturday morning cartoon series the same year, Mr. T. And right on cue, Quaker Oats introduced a crunchy, sweetened corn cereal, shaped in little "T" shapes, which they simply dubbed Mr. T. cereal. Continue reading...

McDonaldland Cookies

McDonaldland Cookies

There once was a faraway place called McDonaldland, inhabited by a clown named Ronald and all of his pals. And one of their collective talents just happened to be making some darned tasty cookies, McDonaldland Cookies. Sure, they may have tasted much like an ordinary animal cracker, but the residents of McDonaldland provided their likenesses. And for a kid making a coveted trip to McDonalds in the 70s and 80s, these were a must have finale to every meal. Continue reading...

Adams Gum

Adams Gum

It’s hard to fathom childhood without chewing gum. Nostalgia just seeps out of the stuff. Maybe you recall the comic tales of Bazooka Joe, or the stick of stale pink stuff in a pack of baseball cards, or the gum that squirts when you chew it, one thing is for certain; chewing gum has its place in popular culture. Endless varieties of type and flavor are available. But you may not know how it all started, which is where Adams Gum comes in. Continue reading...

Razzles Candy

Razzles

Not since the Tootsie Pop has a candy demanded so much self-control. Razzles claim to fame is that they start out as a candy, but once chewed magically transform into chewing gum. That is, if you can get over the hump of letting the transformation take place. It is all too tempting to simply swallow them in candy form. But for those with the virtue of patience, yummy gum soon follows. Continue reading...

Candy Buttons

Candy Buttons

For generations of kids, candy buttons have given a big bang for the buck in the sugar high department. Imagine little candy droplets adhered to a white strip of what basically looked like adding machine paper. Inexpensive, they were an easy choice for a kid to make – sugar domes in every color of the rainbow (or at least pink, yellow and blue.) And while they were marketed as being flavored differently, they really all just tasted like sugar – and there was certainly nothing wrong with that. Continue reading...