Mr Whipple

Mr. Whipple

Perhaps you remember the bespectacled store manager, Mr. Whipple. Always concerned about the quality of his merchandise, the poor guy had a heck of time keeping his female patrons from squeezing the Charmin toilet tissue, in a series of memorable television commercials that spanned over two decades. Continue reading...

Mr Zip

Mr. Zip

He was a tireless public servant, facing indifference and ignorance at every turn. And yet, with the monumental task he was given, he performed like a true hero and made sure that all correspondence was handled in the most efficient manner. He was Mr. Zip, “Zippy” to his friends, and he made the world a better place, five little numbers at a time. Continue reading...

Mr. Owl

Mr. Owl

One wonders how many questions the wise Mr. Owl fielded over the year from the various critters in the forest. As it stands, he will always be remembered for that one particularly iconic question, posed to him by a young boy, who innocently asked, “Mr. Owl, how many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop?” Of course, our fine-feathered friend succumbs to temptation, forgoes science in favor of flavor, and after chomping through the dense candy shell to get to his chocolaty prey, proclaims “three!” Continue reading...

Pillsbury Doughboy

Pillsbury Doughboy

First off, and for the sake of accuracy, it should be noted that lovably irresistible lump of dough with the chef’s hat is really named “Poppin’ Fresh.” Most, however, know him simply as the Pillsbury Doughboy, the giggly mascot with the sensitive tummy. And when he was called on to represent a line of fresh-baked rolls, he didn’t hesitate to rise to the occasion. Let's take a look back at this memorable mascot, shall we? Continue reading...

Rodney Allen Rippy

Rodney Allen Rippy

Nothing says television commercial like a cute little kid with a grinning face and an infectious giggle. It was a formula that worked wonders for a little boy named Rodney Allen Rippy and helped put his mug all over the television set in the 70s. Continue reading...

Rollen Stewart

Rollen Stewart

Few ever knew his real name. But millions who tuned into major sporting events in the late 70s and much of the 80s became accustomed to his smiling face – not to mention his hard-to-miss rainbow wig and religious message. His name was Rollen Stewart, but most remember him simply as Rainbow Guy. Continue reading...

Smokey Bear

Smokey Bear

With World War II raging away, natural resources needed to be protected at all costs. A forest fire could be devastating in terms of lost lumber. The government handed a very special bear the task of informing the public on the dangers of forest fires and the need for watchful vigilance. And for over 60 years, he has proven himself worthy of the task. He is Smokey Bear and his contributions to the war effort and beyond have made him a legend. Continue reading...

Spuds McKenzie

Spuds McKenzie

A dog named “Honey Tree Evil Eye” just doesn’t have a nice ring to it in terms of advertising mascots. Change the moniker to Spuds McKenzie, however, and you have a partying pooch that anyone could love. In fact, that universal love-fest from people of all ages is what would eventually lead to the curtailing of the beer-hawking bull terrier’s appearances. Continue reading...

The Keebler Elves

Keebler Elves

With a taste so uncommonly good, it’s hard to believe that their delicious treats came from a hollowed-out tree. But not just any old tree - this one contained magical ovens, each one manned by the diminutive bakers known fondly to us as the Keebler Elves. And throughout their long history, they have continued to tantalize all who come within sight or smell of their irresistible specialty – cookies! Join us as we remember this trio of tree-dwelling mascots from yesteryear. Continue reading...

The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams

The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams

The idea of escaping the pressures of civilized society in favor of a solitary life in the wilderness is a captivating one. In the 70s, the poster child for such an adventurer was a bearded mountain man with a smiling face named Grizzly Adams. First introduced by way of a a novel in 1972, the cinematic version of The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams came out in theaters two years later and captured the hearts of millions, making Grizzly Adams a household name throughout the remainder of the decade. Continue reading...