TheJungleBookFinal

The Jungle Book

With a cast of colorful characters, and a soundtrack so memorable it could stick in the subconscious like glue, The Jungle Book is not only a timeless classic in the illustrious history of beloved films by Walt Disney, it is also one of the last films that he would oversee. Released in 1967, Disney's Midas touch is evident throughout this rather loose adaptation of the “Mowgli” stories, written by author Rudyard Kipling. Continue reading...

The Karate Kid

The Karate Kid

It is almost impossible to make a list of “feel good” movies and not have The Karate Kid somewhere at the top. This endearing film about an ill-tempered teen and his calm and wise mentor quickly became one of the biggest box-office successes of 1984 – thanks to audiences whose chose to not only see it once at the theaters, but often multiple times. It would spawn a trio of sequels, as well as a Saturday morning cartoon, earn an Acadamy Award nomination for actor Pat Morita (of Happy Days and Mr. T. and Tina fame) and prompt millions of moviegoers to imitate the traditional training method of “Wax on – Wax off.” Continue reading...

The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams

The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams

The idea of escaping the pressures of civilized society in favor of a solitary life in the wilderness is a captivating one. In the 70s, the poster child for such an adventurer was a bearded mountain man with a smiling face named Grizzly Adams. First introduced by way of a a novel in 1972, the cinematic version of The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams came out in theaters two years later and captured the hearts of millions, making Grizzly Adams a household name throughout the remainder of the decade. Continue reading...

The Lion King

The Lion King

If there were any lingering questions about Disney's animated comeback in the 90s, The Lion King answered them all. Released in 1994, after a string of hits that included The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin, the story of a young cub and his ascent to become ruler of Pride Rock surpassed them all. Bolstered by an all-star voice cast (James Earl Jones, Matthew Broderick, Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Jeremy Irons, Whoopi Goldberg and too many others to mention) and by a multi-platinum album's worth of hit songs by Elton John and Tim Rice, Simba and company went on to become one of the highest-grossing films of all time. Continue reading...

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid

Disney's 28th animated motion picture marked the beginning of one era and the end of another. The Little Mermaid ushered in an animated Renaissance for the studio, sparking a string of hits that included Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King and more. The film was also the last fully cel-animated picture for the studio, as computers soon took over many of the animators' more menial tasks. Historical considerations aside, The Little Mermaid was plain old good fun, a somewhat loose adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale. Continue reading...

The Lost Boys

The Lost Boys

Long before Stephanie Meyer unleashed the Twilight book series to a teen audience thirsty for vampire tales, movie audiences were introduced to the sleepy coastal town of Santa Carla. It was within this community that teen heartthrobs and fanged villains waged war against one another in the beloved 1987 horror film, The Lost Boys. Continue reading...

The Love Bug

The Love Bug

Even with a star-studded cast that included Dean Jones, David Tomlinson, Buddy Hackett, and Michele Lee, there was no misconception with audiences as to who was the real star of Walt Disney's The Love Bug. That title belonged solely to Number 53, a sassy white Volkswagen Beetle, complete with blue and red pinstripes and a whole lot of attitude in this 1968 classic. Continue reading...

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

A.A. Milne's beloved characters came to animated life in Disney's The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. Released in 1977, the film was actually a compilation of three separate stories - Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree, Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day and Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too - each of which had been shown previously as a theatrical short (Blustery Day won a posthumous Oscar for Walt Disney in 1969). The packaged format gave Pooh, Piglet, Kanga, Roo, Eeyore and the others a broader audience on which to work their easygoing charms. Continue reading...