The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams

The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams

The idea of escaping the pressures of civilized society in favor of a solitary life in the wilderness is a captivating one. In the 70s, the poster child for such an adventurer was a bearded mountain man with a smiling face named Grizzly Adams. First introduced by way of a a novel in 1972, the cinematic version of The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams came out in theaters two years later and captured the hearts of millions, making Grizzly Adams a household name throughout the remainder of the decade. Continue reading...

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Raiders of the Lost Ark

The two titans of the modern blockbuster teamed up in 1981 for an old-fashioned cliffhanging thrill ride. Raiders of the Lost Ark was the spectacular result of a collaboration between director Steven Spielberg (Jaws) and executive producer George Lucas (Star Wars), who also co-wrote the story. And with matinee idol Harrison Ford in the title role, this archaeological adventure would set the standard for dozens of blockbusters to come. Continue reading...

The Indian in the Cupboard

The Indian in the Cupboard

Years before Toy Story would bring countless toys to life on the big screen, another endearing film managed to animate a few playthings of its own, much to the bewilderment and delight of their young owner, in the 1995 fantasy, The Indian and the Cupboard. Continue reading...

Poltergeist

Poltergeist

While many people have been sucked into a good television show from time to time, it’s far more unlikely to be sucked into the actual TV set. Carol Anne, however, was the rare exception - an angelic little girl caught up in the strange goings on of a house filled to the brim with spirits - some benign and others terrifying. The plight of her and her frightened family made the 1982 Steven Spielberg film Poltergeist one of the most beloved and highest-grossing horror films of all time. Continue reading...

The Ghost and Mr. Chicken

The Ghost and Mr. Chicken

Don Knotts spent a sizable portion of the 60s delighting television audiences with his comedic portrayal of the bumbling Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show. His skittish, afraid-of-his-own-shadow demeanor won the actor three Emmy Awards for his efforts. So, when Universal Pictures was looking for the perfect candidate to spend a harrowing evening inside a haunted house in their 1966 film, The Ghost and Mr. Chicken, they turned to the beloved, bug-eyed actor and the results were comedic gold. Continue reading...

Young Frankenstein

Young Frankenstein

Part spoof, part homage, all comedy, Mel Brooks' Young Frankenstein, released in 1974, did for old-fashioned horror what his Blazing Saddles had done for westerns earlier that year. Shot in black and white, with a spooky score from John Morris, and even using the lab set from 1931's original Frankenstein, Brooks' film looked and sounded every bit the serious horror film ... at least until the first slapstick gag. Let's take a look back at this classic 70s comedy. Continue reading...

Beetlejuice

Beetlejuice

Nobody ever said it was easy to be dead. But, no matter how exasperating eternal life might be, a recently deceased couple learned the hard way that one should be careful of what they wish for – they just might get it. Such was the plight of the Maitland family in Tim Burton’s wonderfully quirky and decidedly dark 1988 comedy, Beetlejuice. Continue reading...

House of Wax

House of Wax

While the 1933 film, Mystery of the Wax was the inspiration for this flick, it simply couldn’t hold a candle to the 3D adventure that was 1953’s House of Wax. With the inimitable Vincent Price in the lead role and screen-popping special effects, House of Wax was destined to become a classic. Continue reading...