The Bad News Bears

The Bad News Bears

Written by Bill Lancaster (Burt's son) and directed by Michael Ritchie (who had helmed adult fare like The Candidate and Smile), this winning 1976 film worked on a lot of levels-and not just the "hey, those naughty kids are cussing" level either. There was the underdog triumph story at the movie's core; there was the satire of the uniquely American institution of Little League and its overly-involved bench parents (in the year of our country's bicentennial, no less). There was also a redemptive character piece at work, as Buttermaker, via his group of misfits, tried to get his shambled life together once and for all. Continue reading...

The Cat from Outer Space

The Cat from Outer Space

From the director who brought the world such classic Disney films as The Horse in the Gray Flannel Suit and The Apple Dumpling Gang, came this cute 1978 comedy about a talking kitty from outer space - a premise not meant to be pondered, just enjoyed. While it didn't quite get (nor deserve) the acclaim of, say, a Mary Poppins, The Cat from Outer Space is still one of those entertaining live-action Disney movies that so many of us flocked to the theaters to see in the 70s. Continue reading...

Splash

Splash

Don't ask why, but little girls always aspire to be the following: super heroines, career women, princesses and mermaids. Before The Little Mermaid's Ariel inspired little girls to centipede in their swimming pools, hold their breath as long as they could, and play mermaids all the livelong summer day…there was Daryl Hannah in Splash. Continue reading...

Smokey and the Bandit

Smokey and the Bandit

Audiences in the mid-70s seemingly expected two things from their movie-going experiences - car chases and Burt Reynolds. So, just like the “you got your peanut butter in my chocolate” commercials, it only seemed natural to pair the two for a wild and crazy adventure involving CB radios, a black Trans-am, and a whole lotta Coors beer in the madcap cross-country adventure, Smokey and the Bandit. Continue reading...

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

The concept of “bumbling inventor” was a tried and true formula for Disney, dating all the way back to The Absent-Minded Professor. In 1989, they would dust off the concept and cast Rick Moranis in the role of eccentric genius. The result was the highly-successful Honey, I Shrunk the Kids. Continue reading...

Edward Scissorhands

Edward Scissorhands

Upon the success of his previous feature films, which included Pee Wee’s Big Adventure, Batman and Beetlejuice, producer Tim Burton decided to introduce audiences to a young lad named Edward Scissorhands in 1990. Played brilliantly by Johnny Depp, Edward was an oft-misunderstood loner just trying to fit in despite some ominous appendages. Continue reading...

Petes-Dragon

Pete’s Dragon

With the popularity of films like Mary Poppins and Song of the South, Disney proved that they could successfully mix live-action and animation. For their next such endeavor, they would once again meld the two mediums in 1977 for Pete’s Dragon, a comedic film about a boy and his invisible, fire-breathing friend. Continue reading...

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Years before theater audiences were introduced to a friendly little alien with a glowing finger and a penchant for Reece's Pieces, director Steven Spielberg offered another compelling tale about visitors from another planet. Having recently put his name on the map with a little summer blockbuster called Jaws, he would switch to the science fiction genre in 1977. The result was Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and audiences would never look at the skies (or a clump of mashed potatoes, for that matter) in quite the same way. Continue reading...