Yellow Submarine

Yellow Submarine

Yellow Submarine was neither the first film to feature the Fab Four, nor the first time we saw them in animated form, but that didn't stop it from becoming a beloved classic. Released in 1968, With its decidedly psychedelic look and a score that included a collection of some of the band's best music, Yellow Submarine took us on an unforgettable journey - all the while imparting the peaceful message that "all you need is love." Continue reading...

Bay City Rollers

Bay City Rollers

Bringing up the rear of the British Invasion, the Bay City Rollers emerged from Scotland in the 70s and after racking up a respectable number of fans in the UK, arrived in America to enjoy even more adulation. Besides gracing the American music charts with a string of hits, the teen heartthrobs also endeared themselves to millions via Saturday morning television. Continue reading...

The Zombies

The Zombies

Following the extraordinary rise of The Beatles, it wasn’t long before British bands were coming out of the woodwork, doing their best to imitate the Fab Four. And, at first glance, one might put The Zombies in that category, but to do so would be unfair. Sure, they had a similar look, lush harmonies, and catchy songs - but the sound was completely their own, in part due to the fine keyboard playing of Rod Argent. And their music is still praised and appreciated to this day. Continue reading...

Missing Persons

Missing Persons

If there’s one thing that could be said about the 80s, it’s that it had a style all its own. But, of all the image-conscious bands to emerge from the decade, one stands just a bit above the others, with their spacey sci-fi clothing, sculpted hair and copious amounts of makeup: Missing Persons. And, upon further thought, you could hardly miss them at all. With front woman Dale Bozzio in silver spandex and multi-colored/multi-dimensional hair, they were equally memorable for their looks as they were for their immense musical talent. Missing Persons ushered in the new wave era, providing some of the best-loved sounds and most peculiar music videos to an audience hungry for more. Continue reading...

Electric Light Orchestra

Electric Light Orchestra

As if they hadn't done enough already, the Beatles introduced yet another new idea into the world of rock music by incorporating cellos, violins and other classical instruments into their songs. Inspired by the Fab Four's pioneer spirit, Roy Wood, guitarist for The Move, formed a new band that would experiment exclusively with the fusion of rock and classical. The result was the Electric Light Orchestra, a prolific group that quickly became a staple of 70s radio and beyond, thanks to an impressive 27 Top-40 hits. Continue reading...

Captain and Tennille

Captain and Tennille

Despite the disparaging remarks of contemporary music critics, the middle-of-the-road pop stylings of Captain & Tennille made them one of the most successful pop duos of the 70s, racking up an impressive five gold albums, six gold singles, two platinum albums and a platinum single. It’s no wonder we see their likenesses used and parodied in media today. They meant something. Continue reading...

The Police

The Police

Though displaying quasi-punk qualities, the Police was never a true punk band. Rather, they effortlessly mixed and matched elements of punk, ska, reggae and pop to create a very palatable rock sound that earned the three musicians numerous awards, worldwide fame and oodles upon oodles of money. Let's take a look back. Continue reading...

ABBA

ABBA

The 1970s shall heretofore be known as the ABBA Era, because we all know the Swedish pop group was the life blood of that groovy decade. Their catchy tunes and graceful harmonies took the world by storm and haven’t lost one ounce of their sparkling appeal over the years. Continue reading...