Ozzy Osbourne

Ozzy Osbourne

From the moment Elvis started swinging his hips on television, rock and roll’s cast of colorful characters has never disappointed when it comes to controversy, whether it be sexual scandals, jaw-dropping tales of substance abuse or even just the occasional television set sent cascading from the rooftop of a hotel. And yet, few have managed to achieve the notoriety of Ozzy Osbourne, a hard rocking singer whose tales of excess and bizarre behavior are the stuff legends are made of. But controversy is only part of the story. Ozzy is also one of the undeniable forefathers of heavy metal, and as a result, has enjoyed a wildly successful career that spans over four decades. Continue reading...

KC and the Sunshine Band

KC and the Sunshine Band

A soundtrack of the 70s would hardly be complete without the inclusion of KC and the Sunshine Band. Emerging during the infamous disco era, they were a staple of radio playlists, thanks to a steady stream of energetic hits that never failed to fill the dance floor. Decades later, loyal fans still flock to see KC and the gang perform their unique brand of pop music. Continue reading...

Peter Frampton

Peter Frampton

Success came early to Peter Frampton. Embarking on a teen idol career in his native England, he soon crossed the pond to conquer the Americas as well. He had a prolific run with the band Humble Pie but he’s best remembered for his solo output in the 70s, including one of the best selling live albums ever to hit the street. Let's take a look back at this innovative musician, whose songs certainly didn't suffer from lack of airplay in the 70s. Continue reading...

Yellow Submarine

Yellow Submarine

Yellow Submarine was neither the first film to feature the Fab Four, nor the first time we saw them in animated form, but that didn't stop it from becoming a beloved classic. Released in 1968, With its decidedly psychedelic look and a score that included a collection of some of the band's best music, Yellow Submarine took us on an unforgettable journey - all the while imparting the peaceful message that "all you need is love." Continue reading...

Bay City Rollers

Bay City Rollers

Bringing up the rear of the British Invasion, the Bay City Rollers emerged from Scotland in the 70s and after racking up a respectable number of fans in the UK, arrived in America to enjoy even more adulation. Besides gracing the American music charts with a string of hits, the teen heartthrobs also endeared themselves to millions via Saturday morning television. Continue reading...

The Zombies

The Zombies

Following the extraordinary rise of The Beatles, it wasn’t long before British bands were coming out of the woodwork, doing their best to imitate the Fab Four. And, at first glance, one might put The Zombies in that category, but to do so would be unfair. Sure, they had a similar look, lush harmonies, and catchy songs - but the sound was completely their own, in part due to the fine keyboard playing of Rod Argent. And their music is still praised and appreciated to this day. Continue reading...

Missing Persons

Missing Persons

If there’s one thing that could be said about the 80s, it’s that it had a style all its own. But, of all the image-conscious bands to emerge from the decade, one stands just a bit above the others, with their spacey sci-fi clothing, sculpted hair and copious amounts of makeup: Missing Persons. And, upon further thought, you could hardly miss them at all. With front woman Dale Bozzio in silver spandex and multi-colored/multi-dimensional hair, they were equally memorable for their looks as they were for their immense musical talent. Missing Persons ushered in the new wave era, providing some of the best-loved sounds and most peculiar music videos to an audience hungry for more. Continue reading...

Electric Light Orchestra

Electric Light Orchestra

As if they hadn't done enough already, the Beatles introduced yet another new idea into the world of rock music by incorporating cellos, violins and other classical instruments into their songs. Inspired by the Fab Four's pioneer spirit, Roy Wood, guitarist for The Move, formed a new band that would experiment exclusively with the fusion of rock and classical. The result was the Electric Light Orchestra, a prolific group that quickly became a staple of 70s radio and beyond, thanks to an impressive 27 Top-40 hits. Continue reading...