Steve Miller Band

Steve Miller Band

With a string of hits like “Rock’n Me,” “Fly Like an Eagle,” “Take the Money and Run” and “The Joker,” the Steve Miller Band came to epitomize the rock sound of the 70s. A blues guitarist at heart, Miller took these stylings into the pop realm and changed the sound of music forever. Millions of records sold later, many would consider him one of the greatest of his era. Continue reading...

Stray Cats

Stray Cats

In the 80s, musical styles explored strange new territory, with synthesizers and drum machines adding a mechanical and futuristic texture. But one band decided to look back to their roots to forge a bygone sound that harkened to a simpler time in music, the rockabilly era of Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran and the famous Sun sessions of Elvis Presley. With plenty of pomade in their hair, flipped up collars, and simple instrumentation, The Stray Cats were a welcome blast from the past. Continue reading...

Styx

Styx

The emergence of “arena rock” in the late 70s, saw the rise of a number of bands that seemingly went from being completely unknown to filling stadiums overflowing with adoring fans. Perhaps one of the most successful in this genre was a group of five Chicago-based rockers who called themselves Styx. Talk about coming out swinging; the band would land four consecutive double platinum albums, the first band ever to do so, and quickly prove they were a force to be reckoned with. Continue reading...

Talking Heads

Talking Heads

Emerging from the same New York scene that gave the world such acts as Blondie and The Ramones, Talking Heads offered a new vision of what Rock and Roll could be, an experimental and artful quartet that decided it was always better to think outside the box. Mixing pop stylings with otherworldly sonic excursions, they produced some of the most intelligent and quirky albums to emerge on the pop market. Continue reading...

Tears for Fears

Tears For Fears

There are some bands that are easy to categorize by genre, or even sub-genre – perhaps never more so than the early 80s. If you weren’t defined as “synth rock” or “new wave,” you were probably exploring “adult contemporary” or “pomp rock.” But for one particular band, Tears For Fears, definitions don’t come easy. They might have fallen into any of the aforementioned categories, or, perhaps they simply created their own. One thing is for certain; their original sound and songwriting skills made them on of the most successful and popular bands to emerge from the era. Continue reading...

The Archies

The Archies

One of the most noteworthy garage bands of the 1960s, The Archies showcased the fun side of adolescence with their sunny attitude and catchy pop tunes. They never performed live because, unfortunately, every band member suffered from acute cartoonitis, a condition that renders the afflicted brightly colored and two-dimensional. Archie, Jughead and the rest of the gang peddled their cotton candy sounds on The Archie Show, a Saturday morning cartoon which debuted in 1968. Continue reading...

B-52s

The B-52’s

There are plenty of party bands, but no other band can party quite like the B-52's. These leaders of the new wave movement took joy in being different, blazing their own trail with a unique combination of kitsch-culture and old-fashioned party music. In the process, they notched up a series of hit albums and influenced countless alternative-rock acts of the future. Continue reading...

The Bangles

The Bangles

All-female bands are a rarity in rock and roll music, and only a few members of this minority have achieved notable success. However, one band overcame these formidable odds to become the definition of female rock-group success. They were the Bangles. This talented quartet rose up from the L.A. underground scene in the mid-80's to become one of the most successful bands (male or female) of their time. Continue reading...