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Schoolhouse Rock

When it comes to scholastic studies, most kids loathe having to memorize things. When it comes to song lyrics, however, most kids can master them after only hearing the words a handful of times. With this in mind, Schoolhouse Rock debuted in 1972, catching children off-guard with their infectious little tunes that taught important lessons about history, science and grammar - without most kids ever realizing what was going on. How well did it work? Well, decades later, many of us can still remember the lyrics to some of our favorite Schoolhouse Rock segments as if it were yesterday. Let’s take a look back at these perpetually-popular educational shorts. Continue reading...

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Dukes of Hazzard

Plenty of television series have taken their viewers into suburban homes and urban metropolises over the years. For audiences more akin to something with a little backwoods country charm, however, The Dukes of Hazzard was right up their alley. With its rural setting, colorful and attractive characters, and a really fast car, this long-running series based on the daily lives of a couple of former moonshiners put aside cerebral themes in favor of fuedin’ schemin’ and car-chasin’ fun. Continue reading...

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Ark II

When the Saturday morning series Ark II debuted in 1976, it bore little more than a slight resemblance to its biblical counterpart. Sure, there was a post-apocalyptic world and a small group of survivors determined to repopulate the earth. And yes, they had an Ark of sorts, alhtough this one was a tad more advanced than its gopher-wood constructed ancestor. It was more of a high-tech Land Rover on steroids. Missing, however, were the countless pairs of animals - although to their credit, they did have a monkey. Regardless, Ark II made enough of an impression on young tykes in the 70s to stick around for a few years on television, then live on in their collective memories for decades beyond. Continue reading...

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TJ Hooker

After commanding the USS Enterprise around the galaxy for three years on the television series, Star Trek, William Shatner made a celebrated return to the airwaves in the early 80s. This time around, he traded his gold shirt, spaceship and phaser for a police uniform, cruiser and a gun, keeping the streets safe from crime on the ABC series, TJ Hooker. Continue reading...

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Soul Train

Ever since its debut in 1952, fans of American pop music could tune in weekly to American Bandstand and keep themselves current on all of the latest artists and trends. But it would be almost two decades later before fans of rhythm and blues were given their own weekly outlet. They would forever owe their thanks to a Chicago DJ named Don Cornelius, the creator of Soul Train, for letting their voices be heard. Soul Train showcased all of the up-and-coming artists of the genre, put a spotlight on all the current dance moves, and, very quickly, became an enduring hit. Continue reading...

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H.R. Pufnstuf

The psychedelic atmosphere of those lovable 60s flowed well into the next decade, especially in the realm of children’s programming, thanks to the wonderful talents and vision of Sid and Marty Krofft. But of all their creations, which included such live-action offerings as Lidsville, The Bugaloos and Sigmund and the Sea Monsters, perhaps no series was quite as trippy, quite as colorful, and quite as well remembered as H.R. Pufnstuf. Continue reading...

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The Twilight Zone

Television took a turn towards the surreal in 1959, with the debut of a new anthology series called The Twilight Zone. Each 30-minute episode might delve into the areas of science fiction, drama, comedy, horror, or political commentary, but the only thing one could truly expect from each episode was the unexpected. Famous for its last minute twists, the success of the show is attributed to the genius of its creator, writer and host, Rod Serling, who imagined some of the most engaging stories to ever hit the airwaves. Today, just about everyone can cite a favorite episode of this classic series, over 50 years after its debut. Continue reading...

In The News

In The News

If you grew up watching television on Saturday mornings in the 70s and early 80s, you probably recall the networks doing their best to sneak in a little educational material between the weekly doses of Super Friends and Scooby Doo. Over on ABC, they chose to teach us about grammar and government, thanks to the ever-popular Schoolhouse Rock. But if you happened to tune into CBS, news anchorman Christopher Glen taught you about current events via In The News. Running from 1971 until 1986, In the News enjoyed a respectable fifteen-year run and made us all a little smarter along the way. Continue reading...