Furby

Furby

There may not be much a call for speaking fluent Furbish these days, but there was a time when children all over were determined to learn it to the best of their ability. Mastery of the dialect meant you could communicate better with your Furby, a little furry creature that looked like the offspring of an owl and a gremlin. And if you wanted to be hip to Furby’s jibe, you were going to need to do a little homework. Continue reading...

Silly String

Silly String

Like some of your finer spray cheeses, Silly String comes packaged in an aerosol container and can be shot at targets up to 10 feet away. Sadly, it’s not edible like its Kraft counterpart, but ever since Wham-O introduced this novelty in the late 60s, it's probably appeared at just as many parties. Continue reading...

Hoppity Hop

Hoppity Hop

Something about being a little kid brings out an irrepressible need to jump and bounce. Who among us didn't assault our bedroom mattresses as if it were a circus trampoline? If you wanted to bounce down the block to a friend's house, and if you weren't quite coordinated enough to handle a Pogo Stick, there was only one real choice - the Hoppity Hop (or Hippity Hop, if you prefer). Continue reading...

Don’t Break The Ice

Don’t Break The Ice

At one point during the 1960s, toy companies raised eyebrows with a line of games seemingly designed to bring out the megalomaniac in every child. With Ants in the Pants, kids launched plastic bugs into a pair of trousers. Cootie taught children the value of constructing even more bugs. But of all these games, nothing came close to being as diabolically fun as Milton Bradley’s Don’t Break The Ice. Continue reading...

Mad Libs

Mad Libs

Juggling between silliness and real educational value, Mad Libs is just about the most hilarity one can have while learning the parts of speech, a fill-in-the-blank party game that arrived in the 50s and continues to introduce new generations of fans to its whimsical wordplay. Continue reading...

Monster Magnet

Monster Magnet

Few toys possess the sheer animal magnetism as the Monster Magnet. First, there was the name. As any marketing executive worth his weight can tell you, include the word "monster" in the name of a toy and you are pretty much assured a hit - especially in 1964. But this wasn’t just about the name, it was about abilities - and this fierce little guy had plenty, making him a most attractive addition to any kid’s collection. Continue reading...

Mastermind

Mastermind

Sitting across the highly polished table sits a suave well-dressed gentleman and his exotic companion, inviting you into the cunning realm of espionage – where codes are made and codes are broken. No, this isn’t a casting call for yet another James Bond – just the box top for a simple little game of logical deduction called Mastermind. Continue reading...

Stretch Armstrong

Stretch Armstrong

He looked like just another pretty blonde head on a Mr. Universe body. A Ken doll with better pecs and a sporty bathing suit. But Stretch Armstrong, first released by Kenner Toys in 1976, was much more than muscles; he was malleable. Bend him, pull him, twist him, tie him in a knot, it didn't even faze him. He laughed at your puny attempts to harm him (note: toy did not actually laugh). Stretch's limbs could be pulled to four times their natural span and still manage to squeeze back to normal size, without unsightly stretch marks. No, we aren't pulling your leg. Continue reading...