Dolly Pops

Dolly Pops

One must crawl before they can walk, walk before they can run - and snap before they can zip. Of course, that last part only makes sense to those who ever fumbled endlessly with their doll clothing before their little hands were quite up to the task of the plethora of buttons, hooks, eyes and zippers necessary for your average costume change. Thankfully, Dolly Pops offered a glimmer of hope to those with underdeveloped dexterity who just wanted to change their dolls dress like everyone else. Continue reading...

Don't Break The Ice

Don’t Break The Ice

At one point during the 1960s, toy companies raised eyebrows with a line of games seemingly designed to bring out the megalomaniac in every child. With Ants in the Pants, kids launched plastic bugs into a pair of trousers. Cootie taught children the value of constructing even more bugs. But of all these games, nothing came close to being as diabolically fun as Milton Bradley’s Don’t Break The Ice. Continue reading...

Dungeons & Dragons

Dungeons & Dragons

What began as a simple love for the fantasy of Lord of the Rings turned into Mecca of Geekdom when Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson invented Dungeons & Dragons back in 1973. From their tiny stone came a ripple effect that would not only rock the gaming world, but also the nation at large. Continue reading...

Easy Bake Oven

Easy-Bake Oven

Moms don’t generally relinquish control of their kitchen appliances to the kiddies, especially the oven, and for good reason – a 450-degree chamber isn’t the best place for kids to stick their hands. And yet, the oven is where all those delicious baked goods come from – moist cupcakes, gooey chocolate chip cookies, basically the finest treats a kitchen can offer. And what about all those future culinary wizards, eager to get a head start in the world of batter and frosting concoctions? Luckily, for the upcoming chefs of the world, and the rest of the kids who simply dreamt of their very own bakery - where they could escape the “don’t touch that” limitations imposed by nervous adults and churn out a never-ending supply of tasty concoctions, there was the iconic Easy-Bake Oven. Let’s take a look back at a toy that offered the sweetest of rewards. Continue reading...

Electric Football Game

Electric Football

When it comes to throwing around a virtual pigskin, there are a plethora of electronic options available today that simulate the game of football right down to the minute details. The grunting players look remarkably similar to their real-world counterparts, the stadiums are replicated to the very last detail, and the gameplay options allow the gamer to do virtually anything that can be done in a real game. Prior to these technological advances, however, electronic football games of the past couldn't rely on realism as a selling point, but they made up for it with a healthy dose of sheer fun, and some of these games are still beloved to this day. Let's take a look at the formative years of football games and the quirky gameplay that forever etched them into our collective memory. Continue reading...

Erector Set toy

Erector Sets

When it comes to toys, the words "some assembly required" aren't often welcomed by parents. But every once in a while, a toy comes along where assembly is the sole purpose, a task left to the child that engages the imaginative mind while providing countless hours of fun. And for almost a hundred years, Erector Sets have done just that, becoming one of the most iconic building toys of all time. Continue reading...

EtchASketchFinal

Etch-A-Sketch

Perhaps one of the most popular drawing toys ever conceived, the Etch-A-Sketch has been testing the imagination and dexterity of millions of artists for the past fifty years with its two little white knobs. Master their operation and you can create a masterpiece. Make a little mistake, and you will literally have to shake it off and start over. Let's take a look back at the history of this classic toy. Continue reading...

Evel Knievel

Evel Knievel

It was just about impossible to be a kid in the 70s and not know who Evel Knievel was. He was the iconic folk hero of a generation that grew up a little too late to catch the space race or Daniel Boone. Eyes were transfixed to television sets everywhere each time he would put on his helmet and propel his motorcycle towards a ramp that would send him flying over cars, buses, fountains, canyons, and anything else that seemed to have a need to be jumped over. Of course, part of the allure of these spectacles was that Mr. Knieval didn’t always make the most graceful landing. Continue reading...