Game Boy

Game Boy

It’s a nice sunny day; birds are chirping, the world is turning, and if you are entranced by video games – you might not even know that such simple pleasures exist. You are tethered to the television in an all-out battle alongside Mario. Wouldn’t it be nice if one could carry their video addiction wherever their travels took them? Well, dream became reality in the 90s and thy name was Game Boy. Continue reading...

Sea Wolf

Sea Wolf

The hunt was on in 1976’s Sea Wolf, a submarine simulator with realistic sounds (explosions, sonar pings, buzzing motors) and a rotating periscope. Somewhere deep in enemy waters, your sub hunted down freighters, warships and speedy PT boats with deadly precision, dispatching your torpedoes with the touch of a button. These features made Sea Wolf a quarters magnet, sucking them from the depths of our pockets for a few minutes of undersea adventure. Continue reading...

Operation Wolf

Operation Wolf

For arcade aficionados in the 80s, eager to earn their commando credentials, Operation Wolf offered you the opportunity to put your shooting skills to the test, as you faced formidable enemies and protected the innocent in this action-packed adventure game. Continue reading...

Lunar Lander

Lunar Lander

A decade had passed since humans set foot on the moon, when Atari decided to give their quarter-bearing customers a whack at it. Released in 1979, Lunar Lander was a challenging, pressure-filled game that probably sucked up enough quarters to finance the real Apollo mission. Continue reading...

Pole Position

Pole Position

Since the advent of arcade games, those that offered a chance at testing your racing skills have always remained a popular attraction. In the early days, the graphics left much to be desired, as you guided your dot through a track of dots without a fellow racer to be found. This all changed in 1983, with the introduction of Namco's Pole Position. Offering state-of-the-art graphics and realistic controls, the game offered a much more realistic racing experience - and aspiring drivers lined up in droves. Continue reading...

Kung Fu Master

Kung Fu Master

You would thing that after all these years, villains would realize that kidnapping the girl never leads to anything but trouble. Luckily for gamers, these sinister scoundrels have proven to be slow-learners, and a endless supply of damsel in distress games has always dotted the arcade landscape. Such was the case with Kung Fu Master. Borrowing on a premise from the Bruce Lee film, Game of Death, this arcade favorite placed our hero in a multi-leveled palace, with each floor upping the adversarial ante. Continue reading...

Dig Dug

Dig Dug

The creators of Pac-Man toiled long and hard to repeat the success of their yellow pride and joy, but didn't have much luck until somebody suggested that going around a maze might be more fun if you actually got to create the maze yourself. Dig Dug, released by Namco in 1982, had plenty of monsters lurking around corners and one plucky digger determined to vanquish them all. Continue reading...

Defender

Defender

Williams Electronics made their living with pinball machines but when the time came to break into the blossoming field of video games, they gave the task to Eugene Jarvis, designer and programmer of many groundbreaking and popular game platforms. He came up with Defender in 1980, a horizontal scrolling shooting game that was harder than it looked, and plenty addictive. Continue reading...