Kung Fu Master

Kung Fu Master

You would thing that after all these years, villains would realize that kidnapping the girl never leads to anything but trouble. Luckily for gamers, these sinister scoundrels have proven to be slow-learners, and a endless supply of damsel in distress games has always dotted the arcade landscape. Such was the case with Kung Fu Master. Borrowing on a premise from the Bruce Lee film, Game of Death, this arcade favorite placed our hero in a multi-leveled palace, with each floor upping the adversarial ante. Continue reading...

Lunar Lander

Lunar Lander

A decade had passed since humans set foot on the moon, when Atari decided to give their quarter-bearing customers a whack at it. Released in 1979, Lunar Lander was a challenging, pressure-filled game that probably sucked up enough quarters to finance the real Apollo mission. Continue reading...

Missile Command

Missile Command

Back in the 80s, the Cold War was still a very real threat so, naturally, the whole global thermonuclear annihilation thing provided an exciting theme for an arcade game. Missile Command, released by Atari in 1980, took advantage of the perpetual U.S. vs. U.S.S.R. standoff to create a virtual world where missiles were indeed flying fast and furious and only you and your quarters could save the country. Continue reading...

Nintendo

Nintendo

It started when a Japanese playing card company decided to get their feet wet in the world of arcade games. They introduced an addicting little video game about a plumber battling an ape and, within five years, the name Nintendo was synonymous with home video game systems. Every family in America didn’t have a deck of Nintendo playing cards in their living room but millions had one of their Game Systems. For a kid from this golden era, it was simply the only game to have. Continue reading...

Odyssey

Odyssey

It's strange to fathom those dark ages prior to the advent of the home video game, but civilization waited until 1972, when we were forever changed by the release of the Odyssey. We owe our thanks to a man named Ralph Baer (who would later introduce us to a beloved electronic memory game called Simon). He was the mastermind that teamed with Magnavox to change the world forever and make home gaming the preferred recreational activity of children and adults alike. Continue reading...

Operation Wolf

Operation Wolf

For arcade aficionados in the 80s, eager to earn their commando credentials, Operation Wolf offered you the opportunity to put your shooting skills to the test, as you faced formidable enemies and protected the innocent in this action-packed adventure game. Continue reading...

Pac-Man

Pac-Man

It’s a yellow circle with a wedge missing that goes around a maze eating dots and dodging ghosts. That, in a nutshell, is the most iconic and legendary video game ever to hit the arcade. Ask anyone with access to electricity to identify Pac-Man and they’ll get it right 99.999% of the time. Created by Toru Iwatani of Namco in 1980, the game had an inauspicious release in Japan but enjoyed a far better welcome in the United States (where it was distributed by Midway). Overtaking the popular Space Invaders, Pac-Man became a staple of arcades across the country and spawned a veritable media empire that is still thriving today. Continue reading...

Paperboy

Paperboy

Space hero, cowboy, mythic warrior...all pale in comparison to Paperboy, the arcade game that allowed the player to work his own virtual paper route. It's a game that might very well have been boring if it wasn't for the fact that the main character wielded newspapers like lethal weapons, just perfect for launching through a glass window. Continue reading...